Does a novel school-based physical activity model benefit femoral neck bone strength in pre and early pubertal children?

Macdonald, H. M., Kontulainen, S. A., Petit, M. A., Beck, T. J., Khan, K. M. and McKay, H. A. (2008) Does a novel school-based physical activity model benefit femoral neck bone strength in pre and early pubertal children?. Osteoporosis International, 19 10: 1445-1456. doi:10.1007/s00198-008-0589-z


Author Macdonald, H. M.
Kontulainen, S. A.
Petit, M. A.
Beck, T. J.
Khan, K. M.
McKay, H. A.
Title Does a novel school-based physical activity model benefit femoral neck bone strength in pre and early pubertal children?
Journal name Osteoporosis International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Publication date 2008-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00198-008-0589-z
Volume 19
Issue 10
Start page 1445
End page 1456
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Springer International
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Formatted abstract
 Summary  The effects of physical activity on bone strength acquisition during growth are not well understood. In our cluster randomized trial, we found that participation in a novel school-based physical activity program enhanced bone strength acquisition and bone mass accrual by 2–5% at the femoral neck in girls; however, these benefits depended on teacher compliance with intervention delivery. Our intervention also enhanced bone mass accrual by 2–4% at the lumbar spine and total body in boys.Introduction  We investigated the effects of a novel school-based physical activity program on femoral neck (FN) bone strength and mass in children aged 9–11 yrs.Methods  We used hip structure analysis to compare 16-month changes in FN bone strength, geometry and bone mineral content (BMC) between 293 children who participated in Action Schools! BC (AS! BC) and 117 controls. We assessed proximal femur (PF), lumbar spine (LS) and total body (TB) BMC using DXA. We compared change in bone outcomes between groups using linear regression accounting for the random school effect and select covariates.Results  Change in FN strength (section modulus, Z), cross-sectional area (CSA), subperiosteal width and BMC was similar between control and intervention boys, but intervention boys had greater gains in BMC at the LS (+2.7%, p = 0.05) and TB (+1.7%, p = 0.03) than controls. For girls, change in FN-Z tended to be greater (+3.5%, p = 0.1) for intervention girls than controls. The difference in change increased to 5.4% (p = 0.05) in a per-protocol analysis that included girls whose teachers reported 80% compliance.Conclusion  AS! BC benefits bone strength and mass in school-aged children; however, our findings highlight the importance of accounting for teacher compliance in classroom-based physical activity interventions.
Keyword Bone mass
Bone strength
Children
DXA
Hip structure analysis
Physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 26 Mar 2010, 01:32:06 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences