Environmental emission of mercury during gold mining by amalgamation process and its impact on soils of Gymple, Australia

Dhindsa, Harkirat S., Battle, Andrew R. and Prytz, Svenning (2003). Environmental emission of mercury during gold mining by amalgamation process and its impact on soils of Gymple, Australia. In: Pure and Applied Geophysics. Air Quality: papers presented at theNovember 1999 International Conference on Air Quality Management in Brunei. International Conference cum Workshop on Air Quality Management, Brunei Darussalam, (145-156). 15-19 November 1999. doi:10.1007/s00024-003-8770-y


Author Dhindsa, Harkirat S.
Battle, Andrew R.
Prytz, Svenning
Title of paper Environmental emission of mercury during gold mining by amalgamation process and its impact on soils of Gymple, Australia
Conference name International Conference cum Workshop on Air Quality Management
Conference location Brunei Darussalam
Conference dates 15-19 November 1999
Convener M.P. Singh
Proceedings title Pure and Applied Geophysics. Air Quality: papers presented at theNovember 1999 International Conference on Air Quality Management in Brunei   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Pure and Applied Geophysics   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher Birkhäuser Verlag
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1007/s00024-003-8770-y
ISSN 0033-4553
1420-9136
Volume 160
Issue 1-2
Start page 145
End page 156
Total pages 12
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The aims of this study were to estimate the total amount of mercury released to the environment during 60 years of gold mining (1867–1926) at Gympie, Queensland, Australia and to measure the mercury levels in soil samples surrounding the mining activity. We estimated that 1902 tonnes of mercury was released to the environment and about 1236 tonnes of which was released to the air. The mean mercury in the soil samples in the vicinity of the Scottish battery varied from 1.07 to 99.26 μg g–1 as compared to 0.075 μg g–1 as background mercury concentrations. The maximum mercury concentration measured in sediments of the Langton Gully was 6.12 μg g–1. These results show that large amount of mercury was used in this area during gold mining. Since mining is active in the area and Langton Gully flows into Mary River, we therefore, recommend that mercury concentration in air and fish should be monitored.
© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 2003
Subjects 0404 Geophysics
Keyword Mercury
Soil
Sediment
Cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry
Environment
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Wed, 24 Mar 2010, 01:00:10 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of Faculty of Science