Word frequency and strength effects during episodic memory encoding: An event-related fMRI study

de Zubicaray, Greig, Finnigan, Simon, McMahon, Katie, Eastburn, Matthew and Humphreys, Michael (2004). Word frequency and strength effects during episodic memory encoding: An event-related fMRI study. In: NeuroImage. Proceedings of: Tenth Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. HBM'04: 10th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM), Budapest, Hungary, (e607-e607). 13-17 June 2004,. doi:10.1016/S1053-8119(05)70014-8


Author de Zubicaray, Greig
Finnigan, Simon
McMahon, Katie
Eastburn, Matthew
Humphreys, Michael
Title of paper Word frequency and strength effects during episodic memory encoding: An event-related fMRI study
Conference name HBM'04: 10th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM)
Conference location Budapest, Hungary
Conference dates 13-17 June 2004,
Proceedings title NeuroImage. Proceedings of: Tenth Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication San Diego, Calif., U.S.A.
Publisher Academic Press
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Poster
DOI 10.1016/S1053-8119(05)70014-8
ISSN 1053-8119
1095-9572
Volume 22
Issue Supp. 1
Start page e607
End page e607
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction
Word frequency (WF) and strength effects are important phenomena for theories of episodic memory to explain. The former effect refers to the superior recognition performance for low frequency compared to high frequency words in recognition memory tests, while the latter describes the incremental effect(s) upon hit-rates associated with repeating an item at encoding. Using the subsequent memory method with event-related fMRI, we tested attention-at-encoding and meaning-based encoding variability explanations of the WF effect, in addition to investigating encoding strength.

Discussion
The increased BOLD responses observed in LIPC and occipitotemporal cortices for encoding of LF words indicate that attention-at-encoding and meaning-based encoding variability accounts are both viable explanations of the WF effect. We speculate that the increased left hippocampal response to LF words is due to their successful encoding being more dependent upon processing of cues related to the study context, as similar activity was not found during both the conventional subsequent memory or strength analyses, making attention or item storage based explanations of this result unlikely. The medial parietal cortex responses observed for repeated items are interpreted as an index of encoding strength.
Subjects 1702 Cognitive Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Presented as Poster no. TU 13 during "Memory & Learning"

 
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Created: Mon, 22 Mar 2010, 13:56:54 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research