Performance changes following training in junior rugby league players

Gabbett, Tim J., Johns, James and Riemann, Matt (2008) Performance changes following training in junior rugby league players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,, 22 3: 910-917. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816a5fa5


Author Gabbett, Tim J.
Johns, James
Riemann, Matt
Title Performance changes following training in junior rugby league players
Journal name Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Publication date 2008-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31816a5fa5
Volume 22
Issue 3
Start page 910
End page 917
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Formatted abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of adaptations to training in young (i.e., <15 years) and older (i.e., <18 years) junior rugby league players. Fourteen young (14.1 ± 0.2 years) and 21 older (16.9 ± 0.3 years) junior rugby league players participated in a 10-week preseason strength, conditioning, and skills program that included 3 sessions each week. Subjects performed measurements of standard anthropometry (i.e., height, body mass, and sum of 7 skinfolds), muscular power (i.e., vertical jump), speed (i.e., 10-m, 20-m, and 40-m sprint), agility (505 test), and estimated maximal aerobic power (i.e., multistage fitness test) before and after training. In addition, players underwent a smaller battery of fitness tests every 3 weeks to assess the time course of adaptation to the prescribed training stimulus. During the triweekly testing sessions, players completed assessments of upper-body (i.e., 60-second push-up, sit-up, and chin-up test) and lower-body (i.e., multiple-effort vertical jump test) muscular endurance. Improvements in maximal aerobic power and muscular endurance were observed in both the young and the older junior players following training. The improvements in speed, muscular power, maximal aerobic power, and upper-body muscular endurance were greatest in the young junior players, while improvements in lower-body muscular endurance were greatest in the older junior players. These findings demonstrate that young (i.e., <15 years) and older (i.e., <18 years) junior rugby league players adapt differently to a given training stimulus and that training programs should be modified to accommodate differences in maturational and training age. In addition, the results of this study provide conditioning coaches with realistic performance improvements following a 10-week preseason strength and conditioning program in junior rugby league players.
Keyword Anthropometry
Injuries
Physical performance
Rugby league players
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 22 Mar 2010, 11:36:28 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences