A comparison of physiological and anthropometric characteristics among playing positions in sub-elite rugby league players

Gabbett, Tim J. (2006) A comparison of physiological and anthropometric characteristics among playing positions in sub-elite rugby league players. Journal of Sports Sciences, 24 12: 1273-1280.


Author Gabbett, Tim J.
Title A comparison of physiological and anthropometric characteristics among playing positions in sub-elite rugby league players
Journal name Journal of Sports Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-0414
1466-447X
Publication date 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02640410500497675
Volume 24
Issue 12
Start page 1273
End page 1280
Total pages 8
Place of publication U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract This study compared the physiological and anthropometric characteristics of specific playing positions and positional playing groups in sub-elite rugby league players. Altogether, 415 sub-elite rugby league players underwent measurements of standard anthropometry (body mass, height, sum of four skinfolds), muscular power (vertical jump), speed (10-m, 20-m, and 40-m sprint), agility (“L” run), and estimated maximal aerobic power (multi-stage fitness test). Props were significantly heavier and had a greater skinfold thickness than all other playing positions. Centres, fullbacks, and hookers were faster than props over 40 m. When the data were analysed according to positional commonality, props were taller, heavier, had a greater skinfold thickness, were less agile, and were slower over 10 m than all other positional groups. The hookers/halves and outside backs positional groups were significantly faster over 40 m than the backrowers and props positional groups. In addition, the hookers/halves and outside backs positional groups had significantly greater estimated maximal aerobic power than the props positional group. The results of this study demonstrate that few physiological and anthropometric differences exist among individual playing positions in sub-elite rugby league players, although props are taller, heavier, have greater skinfold thickness, slower 10-m and 40-m speed, less agility, and lower estimated maximal aerobic power than other positional groups. These findings provide normative data for sub-elite rugby league players competing in specific individual positions and positional playing groups.
Keyword Collision sport
Football
Performance
Rugby league players
Semi-professional
Training
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement Studies Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 31 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 99 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 22 Mar 2010, 08:55:09 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences