A corporate responsibility? The constitution of fly-in, fly-out mining companies as governance partners in remote, mine-affected localities

Cheshire, Lynda (2010) A corporate responsibility? The constitution of fly-in, fly-out mining companies as governance partners in remote, mine-affected localities. Journal of Rural Studies, 26 1: 12-20.

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Author Cheshire, Lynda
Title A corporate responsibility? The constitution of fly-in, fly-out mining companies as governance partners in remote, mine-affected localities
Journal name Journal of Rural Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0743-0167
Publication date 2010-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jrurstud.2009.06.005
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 12
End page 20
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford ; New York
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract In some remote parts of Australia, mining companies have positioned themselves as central actors in governing nearby affected communities by espousing notions of 'voluntary partnerships for sustainability' between business, government and community. It is argued in this paper that the nature and extent of mining company interventions in nearby communities constitutes a new problematic for these corporate actors. Drawing on research conducted in two remote areas in Australia, this paper undertakes an analytics of government to ask how mining companies have become leading actors in determining the future of local, mine-affected communities. It is suggested that their interventions arise from two processes: industry priorities for securing a 'social license to operate' by making a positive contribution to affected communities; and the restructuring of the state which has created an institutional void in these remote localities. As a result, mining companies are 'filling the gaps' in local service delivery through a mode of governing that takes the form of patronage rather than partnership. This raises questions about the future viability of these communities once the mines eventually close, and new challenges of governing for corporate actors. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Mining
Governance
Partnerships
Patronage
Governmentality
Social-responsibility
Community- development
Urban governance
Rural governance
Business elites
South-Africa
Government
Australia
Perspective
Paternalism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 21 July, 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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