Has the effect of parents' education on child's education changed over time?

Chesters, J. (2009). Has the effect of parents' education on child's education changed over time?. In: Lockie, Stewart, Bissell, David, Greig, Alastair, Hynes, Maria, Marsh, David, Saha, Larry, Sikora, Joanna and Woodman, Dan, The Future of Sociology. The Australian Sociological Association 2009 Annual Conference, Canberra, (1-16). 1st - 4th December 2009.

Author Chesters, J.
Title of paper Has the effect of parents' education on child's education changed over time?
Conference name The Australian Sociological Association 2009 Annual Conference
Conference location Canberra
Conference dates 1st - 4th December 2009
Convener Conference Solutions
Proceedings title The Future of Sociology
Place of Publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher TASA (The Australian Sociological Association)
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-0-646-52501-3
Editor Lockie, Stewart
Bissell, David
Greig, Alastair
Hynes, Maria
Marsh, David
Saha, Larry
Sikora, Joanna
Woodman, Dan
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper examines whether the expansion of higher education has reduced inequality by providing more opportunities for students from less privileged backgrounds or further entrenched existing inequalities. Using father’s education and mother’s education to indicate class membership, I examine the salience of Maximally Maintained Inequality theory and Relative Risk Aversion theory with respect to the likelihood of having a university degree. Having a university educated parent is used as a proxy for being a member of the privileged class based on the assumption that the children of university educated parents are more likely to take advantage of opportunities to acquire higher education. I find that the expansion of higher education has had little impact on the association between parent’s education and child’s education. Respondents with a university educated parent continue to be more likely to have a university degree than other respondents. Expansion has, however, improved the odds for women with respect to higher education.
Subjects E1
Keyword higher education
inequality
mobility
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes Conferences proceedings published on CD ROM.

 
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Created: Fri, 19 Mar 2010, 12:43:17 EST by Laurie Sendra on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies