Can sports events affect suicidal behavior? A review of the literature and implications for prevention

Andriessen, Karl and Krysinska, Karolina (2009) Can sports events affect suicidal behavior? A review of the literature and implications for prevention. Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention, 30 3: 144-152. doi:10.1027/0227-5910.30.3.144


Author Andriessen, Karl
Krysinska, Karolina
Title Can sports events affect suicidal behavior? A review of the literature and implications for prevention
Journal name Crisis: The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0227-5910
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1027/0227-5910.30.3.144
Volume 30
Issue 3
Start page 144
End page 152
Total pages 9
Editor Annette L. Beautrais
Deigo De Leo
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, United States
Publisher Hogrefe Publishing
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 110604 Sports Medicine
111714 Mental Health
920410 Mental Health
920412 Preventive Medicine
Formatted abstract
Background:
Engagement in sports and physical activity, either actively as an athlete or in a passive way as a spectator, impacts interpersonal behavior and physical and mental health.

Aims:
The study reviews literature on the relationship between sports spectatorship and suicidal behavior to ascertain whether sports spectatorship has an impact on suicidal behavior, either increasing the risk or being a protective factor. Methods: The literature was searched via PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Nine studies published between 1986 and 2006 were identified.

Results:
The reviewed studies focused on the impact of sports events on the societal level, and analyzed data regarding national or local suicide rates. Their results indicate that sports events can have an impact on suicide mortality and morbidity, but this relationship seems to be mediated by age, gender, marital status, and alcohol consumption, as well as the process and outcome of the game (e.g., victory vs. defeat of the favored team).

Conclusions:
There is some evidence that sports events can reduce the rates of suicide on the societal level; however, there is a lack of studies exploring how sports spectatorship might influence levels of suicide risk in individuals and how mediating variables might operate on the individual level.  Background: Engagement in sports and physical activity, either actively as an athlete or in a passive way as a spectator, impacts interpersonal behavior and physical and mental health. Aims: The study reviews literature on the relationship between sports spectatorship and suicidal behavior to ascertain whether sports spectatorship has an impact on suicidal behavior, either increasing the risk or being a protective factor. Methods: The literature was searched via PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Nine studies published between 1986 and 2006 were identified. Results: The reviewed studies focused on the impact of sports events on the societal level, and analyzed data regarding national or local suicide rates. Their results indicate that sports events can have an impact on suicide mortality and morbidity, but this relationship seems to be mediated by age, gender, marital status, and alcohol consumption, as well as the process and outcome of the game (e.g., victory vs. defeat of the favored team). Conclusions: There is some evidence that sports events can reduce the rates of suicide on the societal level; however, there is a lack of studies exploring how sports spectatorship might influence levels of suicide risk in individuals and how mediating variables might operate on the individual level. 
Keyword Durkheim
Sports
Suicide
Suicidal behavior
Prevention
Review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 19 Mar 2010, 11:56:45 EST by Sheila Cleary on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital