Throwing and catching as relational skills in game play: Situated learning in a modified game unit

MacPhail, Ann, Kirk, David and Griffin, Linda (2008) Throwing and catching as relational skills in game play: Situated learning in a modified game unit. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 27 1: 100-115.

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Author MacPhail, Ann
Kirk, David
Griffin, Linda
Title Throwing and catching as relational skills in game play: Situated learning in a modified game unit
Journal name Journal of Teaching in Physical Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0273-5024
1543-2769
Publication date 2008-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 100
End page 115
Total pages 16
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract In this article, we were interested in how young people learn to play games within a tactical games model (TGM) approach (Griffin, Oslin, & Mitchell, 1997) in terms of the physical-perceptual and social-interactive dimensions of situativity. Kirk and MacPhail’s (2002) development of the Bunker-Thorpe TGfU model was used to conceptualize the nature of situated learning in the context of learning to play an invasion game as part of a school physical education program. An entire class of 29 Year-5 students (ages 9–10 years) participated in a 12-lesson unit on an invasion game, involving two 40-min lessons per week for 6 weeks. Written narrative descriptions of videotaped game play formed the primary data source for the principal analysis of learning progression. We examined the physical-perceptual and social-interactive dimensions of situated learning (Kirk, Brooker, & Braiuka, 2000) to explore the complex ways that students learn skills. Findings demonstrate that for players who are in the early stages of learning a ball game, two elementary, or fundamental, skills of invasion game play—throwing and catching a ball—are complex, relational, and interdependent.
Keyword Physical education
Tactical games model
Theory of learning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 19 Mar 2010, 09:40:25 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences