Does fast defensive line speed influence tackling proficiency in collision sport athletes?

Gabbett, Tim and Kelly, Jason (2007) Does fast defensive line speed influence tackling proficiency in collision sport athletes?. International journal of sports science and coaching, 2 4: 467-472. doi:10.1260/174795407783359731


Author Gabbett, Tim
Kelly, Jason
Title Does fast defensive line speed influence tackling proficiency in collision sport athletes?
Journal name International journal of sports science and coaching   Check publisher's open access policy
Publication date 2007-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1260/174795407783359731
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 467
End page 472
Total pages 6
Editor Simon Jenkins
Publisher Multiscience
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Formatted abstract
This study investigated the influence of increased line speed on tackling proficiency in collision-sport athletes. Eleven collision-sport athletes (mean ± SD age, 25.5 ± 4.7 yr) underwent a one-on-one tackling drill in a 10 m grid. Video footage was taken from the rear, side and front of the defending player. In random order, players underwent a self-paced tackling assessment (i.e., slow-moderate speed) and a tackling assessment with enforced line-speed (i.e., fast speed). Tackling proficiency was assessed using standardised technical criteria. Movement speed into the contact zone was significantly faster (p < 0.05, effect size, ES = 2.00) in the enforced line-speed (3.8 ± 0.3 m/s) condition than the self-paced (3.2 ± 0.3 m/s) line-speed condition. Fast line-speed significantly reduced (p < 0.05, ES = 1.00) the tackling proficiency of players, with tackling players having a reduced ability to maintain a square/aligned body position (p < 0.05, ES = 1.18), make initial contact with the shoulder (p < 0.05, ES = 0.77), and watch the target onto the shoulder (p < 0.05, ES = 0.61). Moderate effect size differences (p > 0.05, ES = 0.51) were detected between the self-paced and enforced line-speed conditions for the ability of players to contact the target in the centre of gravity. The results of this study demonstrate that fast line-speed reduces tackling proficiency in collision-sport athletes. Coaches employing defensive strategies that rely on fast line-speed should also ensure to practice effective tackling technique under these conditions.
© Multi-Science Publishing.
Keyword Rugby
Speed
Tackling
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 18 Mar 2010, 14:31:31 EST by June Temby on behalf of Faculty of Science