Minority report: Social identity, cognitions of rejection and intergroup anxiety predicting prejudice from one racially marginalized group towards another

Barlow, Fiona Kate, Louis, Winnifred R. and Terry, Deborah J. (2010) Minority report: Social identity, cognitions of rejection and intergroup anxiety predicting prejudice from one racially marginalized group towards another. European Journal of Social Psychology, 40 5: 805-818. doi:10.1002/ejsp.651


Author Barlow, Fiona Kate
Louis, Winnifred R.
Terry, Deborah J.
Title Minority report: Social identity, cognitions of rejection and intergroup anxiety predicting prejudice from one racially marginalized group towards another
Journal name European Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0046-2772
Publication date 2010-08-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.651
Volume 40
Issue 5
Start page 805
End page 818
Total pages 14
Editor Anne Maass
Russell Spears
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 170113 Social and Community Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C1
Formatted abstract
The present study investigated the attitudes of one disadvantaged minority group in Australia, Asian Australians (N = 87), towards another more severely disadvantaged minority group, Aboriginal Australians. Asian Australian attitudes were compared to European Australian attitudes (N = 273). Cognitions of outgroup rejection, identification and intergroup anxiety were assessed in relation modern racism, desire for intergroup avoidance and support for a national apology. Both Asian and European participants who perceived Aboriginal Australians as rejecting were more likely to express intergroup anxiety. Anxiety mediated the relationship between cognitions of rejection and the dependent variables. Whilst there was a direct positive relationship between European Australian identification and prejudice, for Asian Australian participants, identification moderated the relationship between cognitions of rejection and the dependent variables. Highly identified Asian Australian participants were particularly sensitive to cognitions of rejection, which increased modern racism and
avoidance and lowered political support. The pattern was reversed for low identifiers, who were more likely to endorse a national apology to Aboriginal Australians when they perceived Aboriginal Australians as rejecting. The role of perceived rejection in predicting prejudice and avoidance, and the moderating role of Asian Australian identification, are both discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 18 Mar 2010, 20:37:22 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences