Maternal alcohol ingestion during pregnancy predisposes to smaller kidneys and albuminuria in Aboriginal children: Findings from an Aboriginal birth cohort

Singh, G. R., Sayers, S. M. and Hoy, W. E. (2004). Maternal alcohol ingestion during pregnancy predisposes to smaller kidneys and albuminuria in Aboriginal children: Findings from an Aboriginal birth cohort. In: 40th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian & New Zealand Society of Nephrology. 40th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology, Adelaide, Australia, (A19-A19). 1–3 September 2004.


Author Singh, G. R.
Sayers, S. M.
Hoy, W. E.
Title of paper Maternal alcohol ingestion during pregnancy predisposes to smaller kidneys and albuminuria in Aboriginal children: Findings from an Aboriginal birth cohort
Conference name 40th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 1–3 September 2004
Proceedings title 40th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian & New Zealand Society of Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Carlton, Vic. Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 1320-5358
1440-1797
Volume 9
Issue Supp. 1
Start page A19
End page A19
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Aim: To examine the relationship between maternal smoking and alcohol use during pregnancy and kidney size and function in childhood. Background: It has been proposed that intrauterine growth retardation causes impaired nephrogenesis resulting in lower nephron numbers and smaller kidneys. This effect could be mediated by such distal factors as poor maternal nutrition and exposure to alcohol and nicotine in utero during critical period of renal development. This may be one explanation for the multideterminant renal disease currently present in epidemic proportions Australian Aboriginal people living in the Northern Territory. Methods: A longitudinal prospective study of an Australian Aboriginal birth cohort (n = 686) was established between 1987 and 1990. Antenatal details were recorded, birth weight and gestational age estimated at the time of birth. Postnatal maternal weight and height were measured. Detailed evaluation at age 8–14 years (mean age 11.5 years) on 572 children included blood pressure (n = 560), urine ACR (n = 533) and renal ultrasound (n = 529) for estimating size. Results: In this cohort, 56% (375/667) of the mothers smoked and 14.6% (88/649) consumed alcohol during pregnancy. Smoking in pregnancy was associated with low birth weight babies but alcohol was not. Alcohol use in pregnancy was associated with current childhood weight, but not current height or blood pressure. Alcohol use in pregnancy was associated with a significantly higher proportion of children with pathological albuminuria (≥3.4) adjusted for age, sex and weight; 14.5% compared to 6.5% (P = 0.03) and with kidney volumes adjusted for current BSA in the lowest quartile (40% compared to 22%: p = 0.003). Conclusion: Alcohol exposure in utero has an adverse effect on renal size and function during childhood. This effect is independent of the effect of low birth weight and provides another intervention target in the ongoing battle to prevent the development of end stage renal disease.
Subjects 110312 Nephrology and Urology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Keyword Renal function
Indigenous Australians
Infants
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Wed, 17 Mar 2010, 11:05:44 EST by Therese Egan on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences