Some phonological aspects of Palm Island Aboriginal English : A study of the free conversational speech of four Aboriginal children on Palm Island Aboriginal Settlement in North Queensland

Dutton, Thomas Edward (1964). Some phonological aspects of Palm Island Aboriginal English : A study of the free conversational speech of four Aboriginal children on Palm Island Aboriginal Settlement in North Queensland Honours Thesis, School of English, Media Studies and Art History, The University of Queensland.

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Author Dutton, Thomas Edward
Thesis Title Some phonological aspects of Palm Island Aboriginal English : A study of the free conversational speech of four Aboriginal children on Palm Island Aboriginal Settlement in North Queensland
School, Centre or Institute School of English, Media Studies and Art History
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1964
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor E.H. Flint
Prof A.C. Cawley
Total pages 550
Language eng
Subjects 420100 Language Studies
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)
Formatted abstract

Outline of research

This study was carried out within the framework of the Queensland Speech Survey.

It is the second of a series of scientific investigations into the varieties of English used by aboriginals in Queensland.

The present study analyses and describes in detail the phonological characteristics of the informal English speech of a group of four male informants, aged between twelve and fourteen years, on Palm Island Aboriginal Settlement in North Queensland.

This speech is described as a hierarchically structured system of interrelated units: phonological phrase, phonological word, syllable, and phoneme.

Other higher level phonological features of intonation, pause, rhythm, length and tempo of articulation and voice quality are also considered in relation to this system.

In addition, this dissertation discusses the effects of these characteristics on the intelligibility of the speech of these aboriginal informants for the non-aboriginal Australian listener.  ..............................

Keyword English language -- Phonology
English language -- Syllabication
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