Hotel Restaurant Co-branding: The Relationship of Perceived Brand Fit, Perceived Risk and Perceived Value with Intention to Purchase

Ann Suwaree Ashton (2009). Hotel Restaurant Co-branding: The Relationship of Perceived Brand Fit, Perceived Risk and Perceived Value with Intention to Purchase PhD Thesis, Tourism School, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ann Suwaree Ashton
Thesis Title Hotel Restaurant Co-branding: The Relationship of Perceived Brand Fit, Perceived Risk and Perceived Value with Intention to Purchase
School, Centre or Institute Tourism School
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2009-08
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Dr. Noel Scott
Dr. David Solnet
Dr. Noren Breakey
Total pages 221
Total colour pages 20
Total black and white pages 201
Subjects 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
Abstract/Summary Abstract This study examines the relationship between perceived brand fit, perceived risk, perceived value and intention to purchase in the context of co-branded hotels and restaurants. Today’s market contains many products and services that can look very similar, and companies use co-branding of their products to make them distinctive from other products on the market. A better understanding of consumer behaviour and attitude to co-branding may improve restaurant profitability and hotel occupancy. One important question to be considered is what determines consumers’ willingness to purchase in co-branded hotel and restaurants? In spite of a number of research papers on hotel-restaurant co-branding written in recent years, previous academic studies have not addressed the relationship between co-branding of hotels and restaurants and intention to purchase. The aim of this research is to examine how the relationship of brand fit, risk and value relate to intention to purchase, and to do this three research questions and eleven hypotheses are proposed. A previous study by Boo and Matilla (2002) has proposed a conceptual model of hotel-restaurant brand alliance strategies, relating management strategy characteristics and consumer characteristics with the consequences of perceived brand fit. The present study develops this existing model by examining the components of brand fit that determine consumer intention to purchase. The study investigates three main areas: firstly, it examines the relationship between perceived brand fit and intention to purchase in terms of perceived fit (overall), complementary fit based on product usage and product goal, and transferability fit based on service quality. Secondly, it examines the relationship between perceived risk and intention to purchase in terms of personal characteristics including risk-taking behaviour and self-confidence; uncertainty of loss including financial loss, time loss and physical loss, and, performance risk. Thirdly, it examines the relationship between perceived value and intention to purchase in terms of perceived brand image, perceived quality and perceived sacrifice, based on monetary and non-monetary price. A quantitative approach involving survey of hotel guests has been employed with data collected in four and five star hotels in Bangkok and Pattaya, Thailand from August to September 2008. A survey questionnaire was administered to guests and a total of 511 completed responses were collected. The data analyses performed using a standard multiple regression method, a paired sample T-test, a chi-square test and a multiple response technique. The results indicate that the model of perceived brand fit in this study has two key components which positively influence a consumer’s intention to purchase. Firstly, the perceived fit (overall), and, secondly, complement fit based on product usage and product goal. Furthermore, for the perceived risk model the finding also indicates two key components which positively influence a consumer’s intention to purchase. The first component is uncertainty of loss in terms of financial, time and physical loss. The second component is performance risk in terms of product and service performance. Lastly, the results indicate that the perceived value model revealed three components which are positively related to consumer’s intention to purchase. The first component is perceived brand image, the second component is perceived quality, and the last component is perceived sacrifice in terms of both monetary and non-monetary price. The conceptual framework developed and tested in this study can be used as a guideline to enable an appropriate co-branding marketing strategy to be developed.
Keyword Hotel Restaurant Co-branding,
Perceived fit
Perceived risk
Perceived value
Intention to purchase
Additional Notes Page color in the thesis 24, 27, 38, 40, 43, 56, 62, 68, 71, 80, 83, 87, 89, 101, 131, 136, 140, 144, 147, 156

 
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Created: Wed, 10 Mar 2010, 20:06:45 EST by Mrs Suwaree Ashton on behalf of Library - Information Access Service