Characteristics and outcomes of injury patients in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population - Queensland Trauma Registry, Australia

Irie, Fumiko, Pollard, Cliff and Bellamy, Nicholas (2010) Characteristics and outcomes of injury patients in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population - Queensland Trauma Registry, Australia. Injury, International Journal of the Care of the Injured, 41 9: 964-969. doi:10.1016/j.injury.2009.09.002


Author Irie, Fumiko
Pollard, Cliff
Bellamy, Nicholas
Title Characteristics and outcomes of injury patients in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population - Queensland Trauma Registry, Australia
Journal name Injury, International Journal of the Care of the Injured   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-1383
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2009.09.002
Volume 41
Issue 9
Start page 964
End page 969
Total pages 6
Editor P. V. Giannoudis
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
111706 Epidemiology
Formatted abstract
Introduction: There are few published data for the magnitude of injury-related health problems in
indigenous people such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The objective of our study was to
compare the characteristics and outcomes of injury in the indigenous population to the non-indigenous
population, who are living in Queensland, Australia.
Methods: Participants were injured patients who presented to the emergency department for treatment
and admitted to 15 public hospitals participating in the Queensland Trauma Registry (QTR) during 2003–
2005.
Results: Amongst 38,036 injured patients, 1847 patients were identified as indigenous and 35,530 as
non-indigenous. Compared to the non-indigenous group, the indigenous group was significantly
younger with no difference by gender. The injury severity score (ISS) and percentage of major injury
(ISS 16) were lower in the indigenous group. Indigenous patients had a significantly higher percentage
of penetrating type injuries compared to non-indigenous (19.5% vs. 12.5%). The age- and injury severityadjusted
mortality rate was also significantly higher in indigenous. In age-stratified logistic regression
analysis, the injury severity-adjusted odds for mortality was 3.0 times higher [95% confidence interval
(95% CI): 1.6–5.5] in the indigenous, compared to the non-indigenous group, in 40–64-year olds, whilst
increased odds in other age groups were not statistically significant.
Conclusion: Our results indicate that middle-aged indigenous patients are more likely to die due to
injury compared to non-indigenous patients. This suggests that strategies are required to improve
outcomes particularly in the most affected injury patient group.
2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Australian indigenous
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Injury characteristics and trauma
Trauma registry
Comparison
Different age groups
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 10 Mar 2010, 13:29:31 EST by Chesne McGrath on behalf of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine