Bacterial skin infections-an observational study

Spurling, Geoffrey, Askew, Deborah A., Mitchell, Geoffrey K. and King, David B. (2009) Bacterial skin infections-an observational study. Australian Family Physician, 38 7: 547-551.


Author Spurling, Geoffrey
Askew, Deborah A.
Mitchell, Geoffrey K.
King, David B.
Title Bacterial skin infections-an observational study
Journal name Australian Family Physician   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-8495
Publication date 2009-07
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 38
Issue 7
Start page 547
End page 551
Total pages 5
Editor Jenni Parsons
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic, Australia
Publisher RACGP (Royal Australian College General Practitioners)
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 920117 Skin and Related Disorders
111717 Primary Health Care
C1
Abstract BACKGROUND We aimed to determine the feasibility of measuring resolution rates of bacterial skin infections in general practice. METHODS Fifteen general practitioners recruited patients from March 2005 to October 2007 and collected clinical and sociodemographic data at baseline. Patients were followed up at 2 and 6 weeks to assess lesion resolution. RESULTS Of 93 recruited participants, 60 (65%) were followed up at 2 and 6 weeks: 50% (30) had boils, 37% (22) had impetigo, 83% (50) were prescribed antibiotics, and active follow up was suggested for 47% (28). Thirty percent (18) and 15% (9) of participants had nonhealed lesions at 2 and 6 weeks respectively. No associations between nonhealing and any modifiable factors investigated were identified. However, indigenous patients were more likely to have nonhealed lesions at 2 weeks and new lesions at 6 weeks. DISCUSSION Clinicians need to be aware that nonhealing is not infrequent, particularly in indigenous people.
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND
We aimed to determine the feasibility of measuring resolution rates of bacterial skin infections in general practice.

METHODS
Fifteen general practitioners recruited patients from March 2005 to October 2007 and collected clinical and sociodemographic data at baseline. Patients were followed up at 2 and 6 weeks to assess lesion resolution.

RESULTS
Of 93 recruited participants, 60 (65%) were followed up at 2 and 6 weeks: 50% (30) had boils, 37% (22) had impetigo, 83% (50) were prescribed antibiotics, and active follow up was suggested for 47% (28). Thirty percent (18) and 15% (9) of participants had nonhealed lesions at 2 and 6 weeks respectively. No associations between nonhealing and any modifiable factors investigated were identified. However, indigenous patients were more likely to have nonhealed lesions at 2 weeks and new lesions at 6 weeks.

DISCUSSION
Clinicians need to be aware that nonhealing is not infrequent, particularly in indigenous people. 
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Discipline of General Practice Publications
2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 10 Mar 2010, 09:20:59 EST by Gillian Vey on behalf of General Practice SOMC