PHYLOGENETICALLY INFORMED ANALYSIS OF THE ALLOMETRY OF MAMMALIAN BASAL METABOLIC RATE SUPPORTS NEITHER GEOMETRIC NOR QUARTER-POWER SCALING

White, CR, Blackburn, TM and Seymour, RS (2009) PHYLOGENETICALLY INFORMED ANALYSIS OF THE ALLOMETRY OF MAMMALIAN BASAL METABOLIC RATE SUPPORTS NEITHER GEOMETRIC NOR QUARTER-POWER SCALING. EVOLUTION, 63 10: 2658-2667. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00747.x


Author White, CR
Blackburn, TM
Seymour, RS
Title PHYLOGENETICALLY INFORMED ANALYSIS OF THE ALLOMETRY OF MAMMALIAN BASAL METABOLIC RATE SUPPORTS NEITHER GEOMETRIC NOR QUARTER-POWER SCALING
Journal name EVOLUTION   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
Publication date 2009-10
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00747.x
Volume 63
Issue 10
Start page 2658
End page 2667
Total pages 10
Editor Barton, N.
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 060604 Comparative Physiology
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
C1
Formatted abstract
The form of the relationship between the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and body mass (M) of mammals has been at issue for almost
seven decades, with debate focusing on the value of the scaling exponent (b, where BMR ∝ Mb) and the relative merits of b =
0.67 (geometric scaling) and b = 0.75 (quarter-power scaling). However, most analyses are not phylogenetically informed (PI) and
therefore fail to account for the shared evolutionary history of the species they consider. Here, we reanalyze the most rigorously
selected and comprehensive mammalian BMR dataset presently available, and investigate the effects of data selection and phylogenetic
method (phylogenetic generalized least squares and independent contrasts) on estimation of the scaling exponent relating
mammalian BMR to M. Contrary to the results of a non-PI analysis of these data, which found an exponent of 0.67–0.69, we find
that most of the PI scaling exponents are significantly different from both 0.67 and 0.75. Similarly, the scaling exponents differ
between lineages, and these exponents are also often different from 0.67 or 0.75. Thus, we conclude that no single value of b
adequately characterizes the allometric relationship between body mass and BMR.
Keyword Body mass
independent contrasts
phylogenetic generalized least squares
scaling
INDEPENDENT CONTRASTS
FRACTAL MODEL
MATHEMATICALLY CORRECT
BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT
CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS
ENQUISTS MODEL
EVOLUTION
PHYLOGENY
SIZE
ENERGETICS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 09 Mar 2010, 11:40:10 EST by Hayley Ware on behalf of School of Biological Sciences