The right to be properly researched: Research with children in a messy, real world

Beazley, Harriot, Bessell, Sharon, Ennew, Judith and Waterson, Roxanna (2009) The right to be properly researched: Research with children in a messy, real world. Children's Geographies, 7 4: 365-378. doi:10.1080/14733280903234428


Author Beazley, Harriot
Bessell, Sharon
Ennew, Judith
Waterson, Roxanna
Title The right to be properly researched: Research with children in a messy, real world
Journal name Children's Geographies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-3285
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1080/14733280903234428
Volume 7
Issue 4
Start page 365
End page 378
Total pages 14
Editor Hugh Matthews
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire (UK)
Publisher Routhledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified
Abstract Unless they focus on epidemiological debates, most thematic issues of social-science journals concentrate on research results, describing methods only as a means to an end. Nevertheless, the burgeoning field of research with children in the context of international rights-based programming has placed a new spotlight on epidemiological questions. What exactly (and what age) is a child when seen as the subject rather than object of research? How does this affect both methodology and method? Does the special social status of childhood imply new approaches and techniques, different ethical considerations, a novel role for researchers? Who should be a child researcher? What, indeed, are the human rights of children?
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Tue, 09 Mar 2010, 00:36:47 EST by Elena Stewart on behalf of School of Social Work and Human Services