Postural changes have a differential response on brachial, compared with central, systolic blood pressure in patients with hypertension

Gilroy, D., Holland, D. J., Sacre, J. W., Sharman, J. E. and Thomas, S. B. (2008). Postural changes have a differential response on brachial, compared with central, systolic blood pressure in patients with hypertension. In: Artery Research.. -, -, (116-116). 2008.


Author Gilroy, D.
Holland, D. J.
Sacre, J. W.
Sharman, J. E.
Thomas, S. B.
Title of paper Postural changes have a differential response on brachial, compared with central, systolic blood pressure in patients with hypertension
Conference name -
Conference location -
Conference dates 2008
Proceedings title Artery Research.   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication London, UK
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Publication Year 2008
ISSN 1872-9312
Volume 2
Issue 3
Start page 116
End page 116
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Background Clinic brachial blood pressure (BP) is typically recorded in the seated, supine and standing positions. However, it is unknown whether central BP may be differentially altered with postural changes, and this may have treatment implications. This study aimed to assess brachial and central BP during different postures in patients with hypertension compared with controls. Methods Study population comprised 41 patients with hypertension receiving medication (HTN; aged 60±7 years; 22 male), 26 untreated patients with masked hypertension (MaskHTN; 57±9 years; 19 male) and 36 normotensive controls (aged 54±9 years; 22 male). The average of two brachial and central BP's (by radial tonometry; SphygmoCor) were recorded in the seated, supine (after 3-5 minutes) and standing (after 2 minutes) positions. Results Supine brachial systolic BP (SBP) was significantly higher in patients with HTN (127±12 mmHg) and MaskHTN (130±10 mmHg) compared with controls (120±13 mmHg; p<0.05). As expected for the controls, seated brachial SBP was slightly, but non significantly (p>0.05), higher than both supine and standing positions. This non significant pattern was similar for central SBP in the controls and MaskHTN patients, but not patients with HTN, whose standing central SBP (109±12 mmHg) was significantly lower compared with the supine position (116±14 mmHg; p<0.05). Conclusion Posture has a differential effect on central, compared with brachial SBP in patients with treated hypertension. This highlights the importance of assessing central BP in these people, which may be particularly useful for managing patients with symptoms related to orthostatic hypotension.
Subjects 1103 Clinical Sciences
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Fri, 05 Mar 2010, 13:21:32 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences