Geochemistry and age dating of ancient and modern CO2-rich hydrothermal systems as natural analogues for CO2 storage: Examples from Australia and Eastern Mediterranean

Uysal, I., Golding, S., Esterle, J., Feng, Y. and Zhao, J. (2008). Geochemistry and age dating of ancient and modern CO2-rich hydrothermal systems as natural analogues for CO2 storage: Examples from Australia and Eastern Mediterranean. In: EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting Supplement. 2008 AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A., (). 15-19 December 2008.


Author Uysal, I.
Golding, S.
Esterle, J.
Feng, Y.
Zhao, J.
Title of paper Geochemistry and age dating of ancient and modern CO2-rich hydrothermal systems as natural analogues for CO2 storage: Examples from Australia and Eastern Mediterranean
Conference name 2008 AGU Fall Meeting
Conference location San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.
Conference dates 15-19 December 2008
Proceedings title EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting Supplement   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Publisher American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Poster
ISSN 0096-3941
Volume 89
Issue 53
Total pages not found
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
We investigated physico-chemical conditions during mineral authigenesis in CO2-rich ancient and recent hydrothermal environments in Eastern Australia (Gunnedah and Bowen Basins) and Turkey, respectively. We performed Rb-Sr and U-series dating of clay-carbonate associations and travertine veins respectively to evaluate the degassing and storage history of CO2. Intense carbonate veining and coal seam cleat mineralisation in the Gunnedah Basin took place as a result of heat and CO2 release associated with magmatism during the breakup of Gondwana in the Late Cretaceous. Widespread carbonate veining and cementation in the Bowen Basin occurred as products of basin-wide CO2 rich meteoric hydrothermal fluids during the Late Triassic extension. CO2 has largely been used for carbonate precipitation (calcite, siderite, ankerite and dawsonite) in eastern Australian basins; however, some high proportion of CO2 has been stored in coal seams as adsorbed molecules on coal. Significant CO2 degassing is common in geothermal fields in Turkey, as manifested by recent deposition of travertine pools and terraces as well as travertine vein networks in damage zones of active major fault systems. Trace element geochemistry indicates that transient ascent of CO2-bearing fluids during seismic strain cycles without significant interaction with basement and host rocks resulted in rapid precipitation of the vein travertine near the surface. Such veins and associated breccias formed by hydraulic fracturing in response to overpressure of CO2-rich fluids. Correlation of high-precision U-series ages with global/regional climate events indicates that late Quaternary climate variability may have controlled the geothermal water circulation that regulates CO2 accumulation and the generation of CO2 over-pressurised reservoirs and their behaviour during seismic events.
Subjects 0402 Geochemistry
Keyword CO2
Hydrothermal
Geochemistry
Age dating
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the subject strand "Hydrology" as part of the session "Multiscale Science of Geologic CO2 Sequestration V Posters", as poster H23D-1005.

 
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Created: Mon, 01 Mar 2010, 14:53:00 EST by Michael Affleck on behalf of Faculty of Science