Occupational Therapy Evidence in Practice for Mental Health, edited by C. Long & J. Cronin-Davis

Meredith, Pamela (2010) Occupational Therapy Evidence in Practice for Mental Health, edited by C. Long & J. Cronin-Davis. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 57 1: 122-124. doi:10.1080/10349120903538101


Author Meredith, Pamela
Title Occupational Therapy Evidence in Practice for Mental Health, edited by C. Long & J. Cronin-Davis
Formatted title
Occupational Therapy Evidence in Practice for Mental Health, edited by C. Long & J. Cronin-Davis
Journal name International Journal of Disability, Development and Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-912X
1465-346X
Publication date 2010-03
Sub-type Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
DOI 10.1080/10349120903538101
Volume 57
Issue 1
Start page 122
End page 124
Total pages 3
Editor Christa van Kraayenoord
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Based on the title of this book alone, readers might expect a presentation of empirical evidence confirming the value of occupational therapy in mental health. However, on the contrary, the clinical areas considered in this book appear to have been selected on the basis of the paucity of an occupational therapy evidence base, and even the absence of a clear occupational therapy role. The argument is that, where there is no established occupational therapy literature to support “evidence-based practice” in a clinical area, it is valuable to consider the range of theory, research evidence, and policy guidelines that might be relevant to practice in this area. The editors make the case that, even in the absence of convincing empirical evidence, occupational therapy can make a valuable clinical contribution based on sound theory and clinical reasoning.

By way of a more general critique of the book overall, several points can be made. Of particular relevance to an Australian readership, this book was written and contextualised in the United Kingdom. Guidelines, policies and documents cited are from UK, English or Scottish Governments; therapy processes reflect British practices; and most of the web resources and training opportunities are based in the United Kingdom. It was also interesting to note that, although some interventions were referred to as person-centred approaches, deficit-based approaches were clearly evident.

These points having been made, this is a text that offers potentially valuable information for the occupational therapy student, or the graduate new to these specialised areas of clinical practice. As an academic, one can only hope that the empirical evidence supporting occupational therapy in these fields emerges in the very near future.
© 2010, Pamela Meredith
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Subtitle: "2006, Oxford, Blackwell Publishing, 186 pp. + index, £26.90 (paperback), ISBN 1-4051-4666-4".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Review of book, film, TV, video, software, performance, music etc
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 28 Feb 2010, 00:04:29 EST