Mechanisms of change in negative thinking and urinary monoamines in depressed patients during acute treatment with group cognitive behavior therapy and antidepressant medication

Dingle, Genevieve A., Oei, Tian Po S. and Young, Ross McD. (2009) Mechanisms of change in negative thinking and urinary monoamines in depressed patients during acute treatment with group cognitive behavior therapy and antidepressant medication. Psychiatry Research, 175 1-2: 82-88. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2008.12.014


Author Dingle, Genevieve A.
Oei, Tian Po S.
Young, Ross McD.
Title Mechanisms of change in negative thinking and urinary monoamines in depressed patients during acute treatment with group cognitive behavior therapy and antidepressant medication
Journal name Psychiatry Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0165-1781
Publication date 2009-12-06
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2008.12.014
Volume 175
Issue 1-2
Start page 82
End page 88
Total pages 7
Editor Dr. Monte S Buchsbaum
Place of publication Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract This naturalistic study investigated the mechanisms of change in measures of negative thinking and in 24-h urinary metabolites of noradrenaline (norepinephrine), dopamine and serotonin in a sample of 43 depressed hospital patients attending an eight-session group cognitive behavior therapy program. Most participants (91%) were taking antidepressant medication throughout the therapy period according to their treating Psychiatrists' prescriptions. The sample was divided into outcome categories (19 Responders and 24 Non-responders) on the basis of a clinically reliable change index [Jacobson, N.S., & Truax, P., 1991. Clinical significance: a statistical approach to defining meaningful change in psychotherapy research. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 59, 12–19.] applied to the Beck Depression Inventory scores at the end of the therapy. Results of repeated measures analysis of variance [ANOVA] analyses of variance indicated that all measures of negative thinking improved significantly during therapy, and significantly more so in the Responders as expected. The treatment had a significant impact on urinary adrenaline and metadrenaline excretion however, these changes occurred in both Responders and Non-responders. Acute treatment did not significantly influence the six other monoamine metabolites. In summary, changes in urinary monoamine levels during combined treatment for depression were not associated with self-reported changes in mood symptoms.
Keyword Urine monoamines
Depression
Cognitive behavior therapy
Automatic thoughts
Dysfunctional attitudes
AUTOMATIC THOUGHTS QUESTIONNAIRE
PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
HOPELESSNESS SCALE
MOOD DISORDERS
RAT MODEL
NOREPINEPHRINE
PSYCHOTHERAPY
PHARMACOTHERAPY
CATECHOLAMINES
SEROTONIN
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Additional Notes Article first published online 9th December, 2009. Not published in print until 30th January, 2010. Volume and issue details provided above for print publication.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 28 Feb 2010, 00:00:52 EST