Holes in your cortex and other anomalies! Glutamate and GABA transporters in humans and other species

Pow, DV, Sullivan, R, Scott, H, Dodd, P and Williams, S (2003). Holes in your cortex and other anomalies! Glutamate and GABA transporters in humans and other species. In: Journal of Neurochemistry. 19th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry: 1st Joint Meeting with the Asian Pacific Society for Neurochemistry, Hong Kong, China, (114-114). 3-8 August 2003.


Author Pow, DV
Sullivan, R
Scott, H
Dodd, P
Williams, S
Title of paper Holes in your cortex and other anomalies! Glutamate and GABA transporters in humans and other species
Conference name 19th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry: 1st Joint Meeting with the Asian Pacific Society for Neurochemistry
Conference location Hong Kong, China
Conference dates 3-8 August 2003
Proceedings title Journal of Neurochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Journal of Neurochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, U. K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Poster
ISSN 0022-3042
1471-4159
Volume 87
Issue Supplement 1
Start page 114
End page 114
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
It is generally assumed that the distribution of glutamate and GABA transporters in the rat is representative of their distribution in other mammals. We have evaluated this assumption using a comprehensive panel of glutamate and GABA transporter antibodies. We made several observations. We confirm that in the rat and rabbit, cortical expression of glutamate transporters is relatively uniform. Conversely, in species such as cats and monkeys we find the appearance of patches of cortex, which are devoid of all known glial glutamate transporters. Such patches are present particularly in frontal and temporal regions and in hippocampus, loci which are afflicted in degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, where abnormal glutamate homeostasis is suspected to play a role. In human subjects, we find that antibodies to the C-terminus splice variant of GLT-1 originally described by Pines G, Zhang Y, Kanner B. I., (1995) J Biol Chem. 270, 17093–17097. only detects a small proportion of GLT-1-containing astrocytes, giving rise to a mosaic of immunoreactive astrocytes. Further, analysis of GABA transporters reveals many consistencies between species but some marked differences; thus, whilst GAT3 is expressed by astrocytes in rat, in monkeys it is expressed mainly by oligodendrocytes. As, in our hands, GAT-3 appears to be an important transporter in the functional accumulation of the antiepileptic drug Vigabatrin, these data suggest care should be taken in extrapolating immunocytochemical and pharmacological data between species. We suggest that 'patchy' cortical expression of glutamate transporters may provide a precipitating substrate that helps to explain the regional specificity of some neurological disease states such as Alzheimer’s disease.
© 2003 International Society for Neurochemistry
Subjects 1109 Neurosciences
Keyword Alzheimer’s disease
Astrocyte
Cortex
Excitatory amino acid
Transporter
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Published under "Poster Session P10: Cytoskeleton, Intracellular Transport, Vesicle Traffic and Synaptic Function" as no.P10-16. Conference was cancelled due to SARS outbreak.

 
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Created: Fri, 26 Feb 2010, 13:52:49 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences