Associations of neighbourhood greenness with physical and mental health: Do walking and social factors explain the relationships?

Sugiyama, T., Leslie, E., Giles-Corti, B. and Owen, N. (2007). Associations of neighbourhood greenness with physical and mental health: Do walking and social factors explain the relationships?. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Australian Conference on Science and Medicine in Sport, Adelaide, Australia, (S112-S112). 13-16 October, 2007. doi:10.1016/S1440-2440(07)70340-7


Author Sugiyama, T.
Leslie, E.
Giles-Corti, B.
Owen, N.
Title of paper Associations of neighbourhood greenness with physical and mental health: Do walking and social factors explain the relationships?
Conference name Australian Conference on Science and Medicine in Sport
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 13-16 October, 2007
Proceedings title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport   Check publisher's open access policy
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1016/S1440-2440(07)70340-7
ISSN 1440-2440
Volume 10
Issue Supp. 1
Start page S112
End page S112
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary associations. We examined the association of perceived ‘greenness’ of a neighbourhood with physical and mental health, and explored whether walking and social factors (social coherence and local social interaction) account for the relationship between them. This cross-sectional study used a mailed survey to collect the following data from adults living in Adelaide, Australia (n=1,833); physical and mental health scores (SF-12), perceived greenness in their neighbourhood, amount of walking for recreation and for transport, social coherence, local social interaction and socio-demographic variables. Perceived neighbourhood greenness was significantly associated with better mental and physical health. Walking for recreation (but not walking for transport) was a significant predictor of physical health, while recreational walking and social coherence had significant, independent associations with mental health. After adjusting for recreational walking, social coherence and local social interaction, the association between greenness and physical health became non-significant, however the relationship between greenness and mental health remained significant. This study shows the significance of neighbourhood green space for adults’ physical and mental health. Greenness was found to be more strongly associated with mental health than it was with physical health. Walking for recreation seemed to explain the association of greenness with physical health, while the relationship between greenness and mental health was not fully accounted for by recreational walking and social coherence. Restorative effects of exposure to nature may be involved in the latter relationship.
Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
C1
120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning
920401 Behaviour and Health
Keyword Self-rated health
Natural-environment
Older-adults
Exercise
Spaces
Perceptions
Reliability
Expenditure
Integration
Multilevel
Q-Index Code CX
Additional Notes 6th National Physical Activity Conference. Abstract 332.

 
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Created: Thu, 25 Feb 2010, 11:41:02 EST by Therese Egan on behalf of School of Public Health