Questions of authorship: Mayer's chandigarh plan and the work of Le Corbusier

Moulis, Antony (2009). Questions of authorship: Mayer's chandigarh plan and the work of Le Corbusier. In: Julia Gatley, Cultural Crossroads: The 26th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, (1-11). 2-5 July 2009.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
MoulisQuestions2009.pdf Full text application/pdf 273.91KB 500
Author Moulis, Antony
Title of paper Questions of authorship: Mayer's chandigarh plan and the work of Le Corbusier
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 July 2009
Convener Julia Gatley
Proceedings title Cultural Crossroads: The 26th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Auckland New Zealand
Publisher SAHANZ
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 978-0-473-15065-5
Editor Julia Gatley
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
While architectural historians acknowledge Le Corbusier as author of the plan for Chandigarh, they also agree that his plan has its origins in Albert Mayer’s earlier plan for the city, adapting its garden city principles towards a rationally based design. Recent scholarship has taken this view further however arguing that Mayer’s co-authorship of the Chandigarh plan be more strongly recognised. That same scholarship also questions the kinds of constructions made by architectural historians that mythologise figures like Le Corbusier arguing that such narrow constructions of architectural authorship lead to an equivalent narrowing of discourse.

Seeking to broaden debate around questions of architectural authorship and conceptualisation, this paper presents another argument regarding the relationship between the two plans for Chandigarh by proposing that the plans were in fact quite distinct and that Le Corbusier did not effectively make use of, or attempt to adapt, Mayer’s original plan. Using the reflections of those architects witness to the plan’s definitive conceptualisation at Simla, India, in early 1951, the paper argues that as much as Le Corbusier’s sole authorship of Chandigarh might be considered a product of a certain myth-making discourse by historians, it is also clearly identifiable in the actions of the architect himself, that is, in the personal politics through which the final design for Chandigarh was produced and authorised. The paper concludes with reflection on the manner in which constructions of architectural authorship reiterate particular conceptions of design as process.

Subjects E1
950504 Understanding Europe's Past
120103 Architectural History and Theory
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 24 Feb 2010, 10:26:53 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Architecture