Larval supply is a good predictor of recruitment in endemic but not non-endemic fish populations at a high latitude coral reef

Crean, A. J., Swearer, S. E. and Patterson, H. M. (2010) Larval supply is a good predictor of recruitment in endemic but not non-endemic fish populations at a high latitude coral reef. Coral Reefs, 29 1: 137-143. doi:10.1007/s00338-009-0566-9


Author Crean, A. J.
Swearer, S. E.
Patterson, H. M.
Title Larval supply is a good predictor of recruitment in endemic but not non-endemic fish populations at a high latitude coral reef
Journal name Coral Reefs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
1432-0975
Publication date 2010-03
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-009-0566-9
Volume 29
Issue 1
Start page 137
End page 143
Total pages 7
Editor Rolf P. M. Bak
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Springer Verlag
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
0608 Zoology
Formatted abstract
Despite extensive research, factors influencing the importance of pre- and post-settlement processes to recruitment variability remain ambiguous. Using a novel perspective, we investigated the potential influence of endemism on the relationship between larval supply and recruitment in reef fish populations at Lord Howe Island, Australia. Larval supply and recruitment were measured for three regional endemic and four widespread non-endemic species using light traps, artificial collectors, and underwater visual censuses. Recruitment was correlated with larval supply in endemics but not in non-endemics, likely due to a combination of low larval supply and post-settlement survival of non-endemics. Surveys also indicated that endemics were far more abundant and occurred in more locations than closely related non-endemics. These preliminary findings suggest that either local adaptation enhances recruitment in endemics through higher larval replenishment rates or reduced post-settlement mortality, populations of widespread species at the periphery of their range are poorly adapted to local environmental conditions and therefore experience lower and more variable settlement and post-settlement survival rates, or both.
© Springer-Verlag 2009.
Keyword Endemism
Larval supply
Recruitment
Reef fish
Local adaptation
Island Population
Retention
Dispersal
Abundance
Mortality
Habitat
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 14 November 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 21 Feb 2010, 00:09:42 EST