Effects of parasites on larval and juvenile stages of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis

Grutter, A. S., Cribb, T. H., McCallum, H., Pickering, J. L. and McCormick, M. I. (2010) Effects of parasites on larval and juvenile stages of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis. Coral Reefs, 29 1: 31-40. doi:10.1007/s00338-009-0561-1


Author Grutter, A. S.
Cribb, T. H.
McCallum, H.
Pickering, J. L.
McCormick, M. I.
Title Effects of parasites on larval and juvenile stages of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis
Formatted title
Effects of parasites on larval and juvenile stages of the coral reef fish Pomacentrus moluccensis
Journal name Coral Reefs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
1432-0975
Publication date 2010-02
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-009-0561-1
Volume 29
Issue 1
Start page 31
End page 40
Total pages 10
Editor Rolf P.M. Bak
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
0603 Evolutionary Biology
070404 Fish Pests and Diseases
960506 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments
Formatted abstract
The ecological role of parasites in the early life-history stages of coral reef fish is far from clear. Parasitism in larval, recently settled and juvenile stages of a coral reef fish damselfish (Pomacentridae) was therefore investigated by quantifying the ontogenetic change in parasite load and comparing the growth rates of parasitized juvenile fish to those of unparasitized ones. Parasite prevalence in two lunar pulses of Pomacentrus moluccensis was 4 and 0% for larval stage fish, 34 and 56% for recently settled fish and 42 and 49% for juveniles. A significant increase in parasite prevalence with age group was found; the most marked increase occurred immediately after larval fish had settled. Standard length did not model prevalence well; as length is a proxy for age, this indicates that the higher prevalence in recently settled and juvenile fish compared with larvae was not a simple result of parasites accumulating with age. In one of three cohorts, there was some evidence that parasitism affected the growth rate of juveniles, as measured by otolith width. The study suggests that settling on the reef exposes young fish to potentially harmful parasites. This supports the idea that the pelagic phase may have the effect of reducing the exposure of young fish to the debilitating effects of parasites.
© Springer-Verlag 2009
Keyword Dispersal
Recruitment
Growth
Migration
Settlement transition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 7 November 2009

 
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Created: Sun, 21 Feb 2010, 00:09:34 EST