Adjustment after miscarriage: Predicting positive mental health trajectories among young Australian women

Rowlands, Ingrid and Lee, Christina (2010) Adjustment after miscarriage: Predicting positive mental health trajectories among young Australian women. Psychology Health & Medicine, 15 1: 34-49. doi:10.1080/13548500903440239

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Author Rowlands, Ingrid
Lee, Christina
Title Adjustment after miscarriage: Predicting positive mental health trajectories among young Australian women
Journal name Psychology Health & Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1354-8506
1465-3966
Publication date 2010-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13548500903440239
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 34
End page 49
Total pages 16
Editor Lorraine Sherr
Place of publication Abingdon, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Understanding predictors of adjustment after miscarriage can assist in the development of supportive interventions. This article uses data from three waves of the Younger Cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (1996, 2000, 2003) to examine predictors of positive Mental Health trajectories among 998 women who had experienced miscarriages. Using the five-item Mental Health subscale of the SF-36 (MHI-5) as an outcome, a multilevel model of change showed a general positive trend in Mental Health over time; also, higher education and satisfaction with the primary care physician were associated with higher Mental Health scores at each survey. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, stress and negative life events were negatively associated with Mental Health. A history of medically diagnosed depression or anxiety was a significant predictor of change in Mental Health across the surveys, with women with such a history showing downward trajectories in Mental Health over time. The data suggest that greater targeted support and monitoring for women who have a history of mental health problems may assist those women to cope following miscarriage.
© 2010 Taylor & Francis
Keyword Miscarriage
Adjustment
Longitudinal
Mental health
Depressive symptoms
Pregnancy loss
Risk-factors
Follow-up
Experience
Grief
Anxiety- parent
UK
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 21 Feb 2010, 00:01:14 EST