Effect of nitrogen fertilizer management and waterlogging on nitrous oxide emission from subtropical sugarcane soils

Allen, D. E., Kingston, G., Rennenberg, H., Dalal, R. C. and Schmidt, S. (2010) Effect of nitrogen fertilizer management and waterlogging on nitrous oxide emission from subtropical sugarcane soils. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 136 3-4: 209-217. doi:10.1016/j.agee.2009.11.002


Author Allen, D. E.
Kingston, G.
Rennenberg, H.
Dalal, R. C.
Schmidt, S.
Title Effect of nitrogen fertilizer management and waterlogging on nitrous oxide emission from subtropical sugarcane soils
Journal name Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-8809
1873-2305
Publication date 2010-03
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.agee.2009.11.002
Volume 136
Issue 3-4
Start page 209
End page 217
Total pages 9
Editor M. R. Carter
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elseiver BV
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
829802 Management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plant Production
050303 Soil Biology
Formatted abstract
Considerable potential for N2O emission from Australian sugarcane systems exists from high N fertilizer application rates and periodic waterlogging. To determine N2O emissions, 2 experiments were conducted on ratooned sugarcane grown under field conditions. In the first experiment, crops received 0, 100 or 200 kg N ha-1 as single or split application. In the second experiment, a sub-set of the single N application plots was subjected to waterlogging. Higher N2O emissions (350 mg–17 mg N2Om-2 h-1)
occurred during warm and wet months (November–February) and coincided with high availability of mineralN in top soil (10–500 mg N kg-1 soil). Lower emissions (<350 mg N2Om-2 h-1) were detected in cool and dry months (March–October) coinciding with availability of low mineral N (<10 mg N kg-1 soil). Regression analysis showed significant positive correlations between N2O emissions and soil temperature, water-filled pore space and mineral N (ammonium and nitrate) content. N2O emissions,
soil mineral N content and crop yield followed N application rates (0 < 100 < 200 kg N ha-1) and waterlogging amplified N2O emission. Split application of N fertilizer reduced annual N2O emissions in the 200 kg N ha-1 treatment. We estimate, using the IPCC Tier 1 approach that between 1.0% and 6.7% of applied N fertilizer was emitted as N2O. Our study demonstrates that immediate reduction of N2O
emissions can be achieved by avoiding high levels of soil mineral N pools and waterlogging through appropriate fertilizer rates and time of application and soil management.
© 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved
Keyword N2O
Trace gases
Sustainable agriculture
Experimental flooding
N fertilizer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 16 December 2009

 
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Created: Fri, 19 Feb 2010, 14:28:39 EST by Hayley Ware on behalf of School of Biological Sciences