Conducting surveys on forestry attitudes and practices in Leyte Communities, Philippines: Experiences and lessons learnt

Cedamon, Edwin D. and Emtage, Nick (2005) Conducting surveys on forestry attitudes and practices in Leyte Communities, Philippines: Experiences and lessons learnt. Small-Scale Forestry Economics, Management and Policy, 4 1: 69-84. doi:10.1007/s11842-005-0005-x


Author Cedamon, Edwin D.
Emtage, Nick
Title Conducting surveys on forestry attitudes and practices in Leyte Communities, Philippines: Experiences and lessons learnt
Journal name Small-Scale Forestry Economics, Management and Policy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-7617
1873-7854
Publication date 2005-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11842-005-0005-x
Volume 4
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 84
Total pages 16
Editor S. Harrison
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Publisher The University of Queensland. School of Natural and Rural Systems Management
Language eng
Subject C1
370106 Sociological Methodology and Research Methods
620399 Forestry not elsewhere classified
Abstract A survey of forestry practices and attitudes was undertaken in four communities in Leyte, the Philippines, to improve understanding of the social and economic factors affecting small-scale forestry development. The survey had three main data collection activities — initial focus group discussions (FGDs), household interviews, and reporting and validation FGDs. A team of enumerators was selected for household interviews which consisted of both males and females, to avoid potential problems of unwillingness of people to talk with those of the opposite gender. The interviewers were also required to be able to speak local dialects (Cebuano and Waray Waray), the survey questionnaires being administered in these dialects. Various methods were used to gain the support and assistance of local government units and barangay captains. Some difficulty was experienced by the survey team in the first community due to barangay elections at the time of the survey, and the requirement by the University of Queensland Ethics Committee that respondents sign a consent form. This requirement was found to be not culturally appropriate for the Leyte smallholder communities. Offering goods at the end of the interview was found to be of limited value for encouraging participation in the survey. Provision of food and drinks were found to encourage FGD participants to express their views, but too much alcohol had a negative effect. The importance of providing comprehensive feedback to respondents and involving them and other stakeholders in development of policy recommendations was apparent. These survey experiences provide valuable insights which are not generally available in textbooks on sample surveys, and provide lessons for planning and conducting smallholder community survey into natural resource management issues.
Keyword Focus groups
Household interviews
Local dialects
Ethics committee
People’s organisation
Validation of survey findings
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes In 2007, Journal title continued by: Small-Scale Forestry (Springer, ISSN: 1873-7854)

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Fri, 19 Feb 2010, 13:04:26 EST by Therese Egan on behalf of School of Integrative Systems