Management of central venous catheters in adult intensive care units in Australia: Policies and practices

Bolz, Katharina, Ramritu, Prabha, Halton, Kate, Cook, David and Graves, Nicholas (2008) Management of central venous catheters in adult intensive care units in Australia: Policies and practices. Healthcare Infection, 13 2: 48-55. doi:10.1071/HI08016


Author Bolz, Katharina
Ramritu, Prabha
Halton, Kate
Cook, David
Graves, Nicholas
Title Management of central venous catheters in adult intensive care units in Australia: Policies and practices
Journal name Healthcare Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1835-5617
1835-5625
Publication date 2008-06-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/HI08016
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 48
End page 55
Total pages 8
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic., Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Abstract The aim of this study was to describe current practice for insertion and care of central venous catheters (CVCs) in intensive care units (ICUs) in Australia and to compare current practice with international guidelines. A prospective telephone survey was conducted to gather data that describe existing practices. A multivariate analysis of the data was conducted using clustering techniques. In the context of this study, cluster analysis was used to find groups with similar approaches to CVC practices. Forty Australian hospitals with level 2 or 3 ICUs as defined by ANZICS were randomly selected and four ICU nurses from each were randomly selected for interview. A total of 34 ICUs and 133 ICU nurses agreed to participate. All states and territories were represented. The majority of CVC management practices in Australian ICUs are consistent with the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. However, practices that did not comply with the recommendations included maximal sterile barrier recautions such as use of cap and mask, choice of dressing, catheter insertion site, cleansing ofCVCport beforeCVCaccess, replacement of administration sets and CVCs, removal of CVCs and the choice of liquid soap over antiseptic containing soap. The heterogeneity of practice observed and the divergence from theCDCguidelines suggests that practices for insertion and care of CVCs in ICUs in Australia can be improved. Improved practice may result in lower rates of catheter-related bloodstream infection, save costs and improve health outcomes.
Keyword Catheter
Catheter related infection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
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Created: Thu, 18 Feb 2010, 15:55:23 EST by Sue Green on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences