Social Problem Solving Inventory - Revised Short Form (SPSI-R:S): An evaluation of its psychometric properties and predictive capacity with a young adolescent population

Miss Claire Gisele Easton (). Social Problem Solving Inventory - Revised Short Form (SPSI-R:S): An evaluation of its psychometric properties and predictive capacity with a young adolescent population Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Miss Claire Gisele Easton
Thesis Title Social Problem Solving Inventory - Revised Short Form (SPSI-R:S): An evaluation of its psychometric properties and predictive capacity with a young adolescent population
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr Jeanie Sheffield
Dr Kate Sofronoff
Total pages 148
Total colour pages 5
Total black and white pages 143
Abstract/Summary Abstract The term social problem solving refers to problem solving as it occurs in the real world. It has been defined as the self-directed cognitive-behavioural process by which a person attempts to discover effective ways of coping with challenging situations encountered in the course of everyday life (D'Zurilla & Nezu, 1999). Substantial research has documented the important role that social problem solving plays in the management of life stressors and subsequent development of psychopathology. Past research highlights the strong link between the ability to cope with or resolve everyday stressful events and an individual’s personal or social functioning (D'Zurilla & Nezu, 2001). The primary goal of this thesis was to review the measurement and clinical utility of this construct in terms of a young, Australian adolescent population. In order to achieve this aim, a large sample was used to conduct novel analyses in two separate studies. The first study revealed the Social Problem Solving Inventory – Revised: Short Form (SPSI-R:S) to be a sound measure for use with an adolescent population. Results of a subsequent evaluation of the measure’s psychometric properties provided strong support for internal consistency reliability and adequate temporal stability. Additionally, structural, concurrent and predictive validity where shown. Overall, the SPSI-R:S performed well and was found to be a time-efficient, reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of social problem solving among young, Australian adolescents. The aim of the second study was to evaluate the predictive capacity of the SPSI-R:S. This entailed an examination of the relationship between social problem solving and adverse life events on the psychological functioning of young adolescents. Specifically, it examined a moderation model of this relationship predicting internalising and externalising factors, both cross-sectionally and over time. The results showed that in the presence of either higher or lower levels of life stress, social problem solving (as measured by the problem solving orientation subscales of the SPSI-R:S) is a moderating factor, which can exacerbate or attenuate the likelihood of developing depressive symptomatology, both cross-sectionally and over time. It was also found that, in the presence of either higher or lower levels of life stress, social problem solving (as measured by the negative problem solving orientation subscale of the SPSI-R:S) moderates the likelihood of developing externalising symptoms over time, but not in the shorter term. These results, taken together with the identified stronger direct relationship between problem solving and both internalising and externalising symptoms (crosssectionally and when examining predictions over a one-year period) underline the importance of problem solving orientation as a predictor of psychopathology in both male and female adolescents. Overall, results support the suggestion that problem solving orientation may play a role in the development of depressive symptoms over time. Strengths and limitations of the study are noted and both implications for clinical use and future research are discussed.
Keyword Social Problem Solving Inventory - Revised Short Form (SPSI-R:S)
adolescence
problem solving

 
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Created: Wed, 17 Feb 2010, 22:16:36 EST by Miss Claire Easton