Processes driving male breeding colour and ecomorphological diversification in rainbow skinks: A phylogenetic comparative test

Dolman, Gaynor and Stuart-Fox, Devi (2010) Processes driving male breeding colour and ecomorphological diversification in rainbow skinks: A phylogenetic comparative test. Evolutionary Ecology, 24 1: 97-113. doi:10.1007/s10682-009-9293-5


Author Dolman, Gaynor
Stuart-Fox, Devi
Title Processes driving male breeding colour and ecomorphological diversification in rainbow skinks: A phylogenetic comparative test
Journal name Evolutionary Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-7653
1573-8477
Publication date 2010-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10682-009-9293-5
Volume 24
Issue 1
Start page 97
End page 113
Total pages 17
Editor Josef F. Stuefer
Place of publication The Netherlands
Publisher Kluwer Academic
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060309 Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
Formatted abstract
We used a phylogenetic comparative approach to investigate the importance of ecological shifts in the diversification of both signalling traits and ecomorphological traits in a diverse group of Australian skinks (Carlia). First, we tested whether divergence in male breeding coloration is associated with shifts in habitat openness. Second, we examined whether the type or location of male breeding coloration changes predictably with habitat openness. Third, we tested the ecomorphological predictions that body size should vary in relation to habitat openness and that limb length, toe length and head depth should vary with substrate use. Divergence in male breeding coloration was positively associated with shifts in habitat openness. Our results also indicate that species occupying more open habitats tend to use male sexual signals located on lateral body regions and not necessarily on body regions that are potentially more concealed from aerial predators (e. g. chest and throat). With regard to ecomorphological traits, habitat openness appears to have no predictable influence on body size at the inter-specific level, contrary to expectations based on intra-specific studies. However, consistent with functional predictions, we found that preference for rocky habitats is associated with relatively longer hind limb length, presumably due to selection for greater speed and jumping ability on these substrates. Overall, results of this study support the hypothesis that ecological shifts play a central role in promoting morphological diversification.
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
Keyword Carlia
Ecological speciation
Sexual signals
Ecomorphology
Comparative test
Natural selection
Ecological gradients
Poecilia-reticulata
Refugal isolation
Carlia-Jarnoldae
Sexual selection
Central Chile
Evolution
Lizards
Adaptation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 1 February 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Feb 2010, 00:02:41 EST