The long and the short of sperm selection in vitro and in vivo: Swim-up techniques select for the longer and faster swimming mammalian sperm

Holt, W. V., Hernandez, M., Warrell, L. and Satake, N. (2010) The long and the short of sperm selection in vitro and in vivo: Swim-up techniques select for the longer and faster swimming mammalian sperm. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 23 3: 598-608. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.01935.x


Author Holt, W. V.
Hernandez, M.
Warrell, L.
Satake, N.
Title The long and the short of sperm selection in vitro and in vivo: Swim-up techniques select for the longer and faster swimming mammalian sperm
Formatted title
The long and the short of sperm selection in vitro and in vivo: Swim-up techniques select for the longer and faster swimming mammalian sperm
Journal name Journal of Evolutionary Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1010-061X
1420-9101
Publication date 2010-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.01935.x
Volume 23
Issue 3
Start page 598
End page 608
Total pages 11
Editor A. J. Moore
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
060803 Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Sperm competition and sexual selection outcomes are sometimes reported as depending on sperm velocity and flagellar length, suggesting that sperm shape may be optimized for maximum efficiency. This is a largely unexamined assumption regarding sperm performance. Here, we examine this idea using a 'swim-up' selection technique as a proxy for sperm transport within the female tract, testing the hypothesis that variation in sperm tail length should be reduced by this procedure. We detected small but significant (P < 0.001) increases in mean flagellar length in brown hare, pig and bull spermatozoa without reduction in variance. Applying the swim-up technique to boar ejaculates confirmed that the selected populations were enriched for fast motile spermatozoa. These effects were also reflected in vivo where boar spermatozoa with both short and long flagellae were able to reach and colonize the oviductal sperm reservoir. The benefits of possessing a longer flagellum thus appear to be marginal, suggesting that sperm selection in vivo is based on more complex criteria.  © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.
Keyword Boar
Brown hare
Bull
Oviduct
Sperm length
Swim-up
Postcopulatory sexual selection
Intraspecific variation
Natural-populations
Competition games
Passerine birds
Male-fertility
Pig oviduct
Motility
Spermatozoa
Size
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 14 Feb 2010, 00:01:41 EST