Retained fishing gear and associated injuries in the east Australian grey nurse sharks (Carcharias taurus): Implications for population recovery

Bansemer, C. S. and Bennett, M. B. (2010) Retained fishing gear and associated injuries in the east Australian grey nurse sharks (Carcharias taurus): Implications for population recovery. Marine and Freshwater Research, 61 1: 97-103. doi:10.1071/MF08362


Author Bansemer, C. S.
Bennett, M. B.
Title Retained fishing gear and associated injuries in the east Australian grey nurse sharks (Carcharias taurus): Implications for population recovery
Formatted title
Retained fishing gear and associated injuries in the east Australian grey nurse sharks (Carcharias taurus): Implications for population recovery
Journal name Marine and Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
1448-6059
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF08362
Volume 61
Issue 1
Start page 97
End page 103
Total pages 7
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic., Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Incidental hooking of Carcharias taurus is a threat to their populations' recovery on the east coast of Australia. Photo-identification techniques were used to investigate the frequency of hooking at 25 aggregation sites along the east coast of Australia between 2006 and 2008. Of the 673 sharks identified, 113 sharks were identified with signs of 119 incidences of hooking. For sharks with both their left and right flank photographed during a single survey day, up to 29% of females and 52% of males were identified with retained fishing gear or an attributed jaw injury. The largest number of sharks identified (222) were from a year-round aggregation of immature and mature sharks at Fish Rock, New South Wales, Australia. Forty-eight per cent of all sharks identified with retained fishing gear were first identified at this site. Fish Rock, a designated critical habitat for C. taurus, allows most forms of line fishing except fishing with bait or wire trace while anchored or moored. As interactions with fishing gear can result in debilitating disease, morbidity and death, the high incidence of hooked individual C. taurus is considered a key threatening process that is likely to reduce this shark population's ability to recover. © 2010 CSIRO.
Keyword Conservation
Predatory sharks
Prionace-glauca
South Africa
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Feb 2010, 00:01:15 EST