Botswana’s development: Its economic structure and rural poverty

Moepeng, Pelotshweu T. (Pelotshweu Tapalogo) and Tisdell, Clement Allan (2008). Botswana’s development: Its economic structure and rural poverty. Working papers on Social economics, policy and development 49, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

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Author Moepeng, Pelotshweu T. (Pelotshweu Tapalogo)
Tisdell, Clement Allan
Title Botswana’s development: Its economic structure and rural poverty
School, Department or Centre School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Open Access Status Other
Series Working papers on Social economics, policy and development
Report Number 49
Publication date 2008-02
Publisher University of Queensland Press for School of Economics
Start page 1
End page 35
Total pages 35
Language eng
Subject 14 Economics
1401 Economic Theory
1402 Applied Economics
140201 Agricultural Economics
140202 Economic Development and Growth
Abstract/Summary Botswana was among the highest growing economies in the world during 1985-2005 and achieved a reduction in its overall incidence of poverty from 60 per cent in 1985/86 to 30 per cent in 2002/03. The incidence of rural poverty in Botswana decreased from 55 per cent in 1985/86 to 40 per cent in 1992/93, however, it increased to 45 per cent in 2002/03. The reversal of gains in rural poverty reduction has motivated this study. An analysis of Botswana’s overall economic performance, demographic changes and movements and policy responses contribute to the understanding of the occurrence of the incidence of rural poverty in Botswana. In conclusion, it is found that Botswana’s rural and non-rural economy might appear to be characterised by dualism using the economic input-output analysis, whereas in fact important economic linkages exist between these sectors because of government spending policy, private remittances, government transfers and rural development policy. Therefore, there is no economic dualism in Botswana, and the rural population benefits directly from Botswana’s sustained economic growth.
Keyword Botswana
Economic development
Rural Africa
Rural poverty
Inequality
Economics - Botswana
Rural poor - Botswana
Botswana - Economic conditions
Botswana - Economic policy

 
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Created: Fri, 05 Feb 2010, 09:16:16 EST by Rosalind Blair on behalf of Faculty of Business, Economics & Law