Cyclotide proteins and precursors from the genus Gloeospermum: Filling a blank spot in the cyclotide map of Violaceae

Burman, Robert, Gruber, Christian W., Rizzardi, Kristina, Herrmann, Anders, Craik, David J., Gupta, Mahabir P. and Goransson, Ulf (2010) Cyclotide proteins and precursors from the genus Gloeospermum: Filling a blank spot in the cyclotide map of Violaceae. Phytochemistry, 71 1: 13-20. doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2009.09.023

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Author Burman, Robert
Gruber, Christian W.
Rizzardi, Kristina
Herrmann, Anders
Craik, David J.
Gupta, Mahabir P.
Goransson, Ulf
Title Cyclotide proteins and precursors from the genus Gloeospermum: Filling a blank spot in the cyclotide map of Violaceae
Formatted title
Cyclotide proteins and precursors from the genus Gloeospermum: Filling a blank spot in the cyclotide map of Violaceae
Journal name Phytochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-9422
1873-3700
Publication date 2010-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.phytochem.2009.09.023
Volume 71
Issue 1
Start page 13
End page 20
Total pages 8
Editor G. P. Bolwell
Place of publication Oxford, U.K
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
97 Expanding Knowledge
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Cyclotides are disulfide-rich plant proteins that are exceptional in their cyclic structure; their N and C termini are joined by a peptide bond, forming a continuous circular backbone, which is reinforced by three interlocked disulfide bonds. Cyclotides have been found mainly in the coffee (Rubiaceae) and violet (Violaceae) plant families. Within the Violaceae, cyclotides seem to be widely distributed, but the cyclotide complements of the vast majority of Violaceae species have not yet been explored. This study provides insight into cyclotide occurrence, diversity and biosynthesis in the Violaceae, by identifying mature cyclotide proteins, their precursors and enzymes putatively involved in their biosynthesis in the tribe Rinoreeae and the genus Gloeospermum. Twelve cyclotides from two Panamanian species, Gloeospermum pauciflorum Hekking and Gloeospermum blakeanum (Standl.) Hekking (designated Glopa A-E and Globa A-G, respectively) were characterised through cDNA screening and protein isolation. Screening of cDNA for the oxidative folding enzymes protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) and thioredoxin (TRX) resulted in positive hits in both species. These enzymes have demonstrated roles in oxidative folding of cyclotides in Rubiaceae, and results presented here indicate that Violaceae plants have evolved similar mechanisms of cyclotide biosynthesis. We also describe PDI and TRX sequences from a third cyclotide-expressing Violaceae species, Viola biflora L., which further support this hypothesis.
© 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Cyclotide
Cyclic peptide
Gloeospermum blakeanum
Gloeospermum pauciflorum
Violaceae
Protein-disulfide isomerase
Thioredoxin
Precursor
Cyclic-cystine-knot
Disulfide-isomerase family
Tandem mass-spectrometry
Circular proteins
Plant cyclotides
Macrocyclic polypeptides
Neotropical violaceae
Hybanthus violaceae
Cycloviolacin O2
Biosynthesis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 30 October 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Feb 2010, 23:59:02 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience