In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide: The 2003 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART)

Paterson, David L., Rossi, Flávia, Baquero, Fernando, Hsueh, Po-Ren, Woods, Gail L., Satishchandran, Vilas, Snyder, Theresa A., Harvey, Charlotte M., Teppler, Hedy, DiNubile, Mark J. and Chow, Joseph W. (2005) In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide: The 2003 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART). Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 55 6: 965-973. doi:10.1093/jac/dki117


Author Paterson, David L.
Rossi, Flávia
Baquero, Fernando
Hsueh, Po-Ren
Woods, Gail L.
Satishchandran, Vilas
Snyder, Theresa A.
Harvey, Charlotte M.
Teppler, Hedy
DiNubile, Mark J.
Chow, Joseph W.
Title In vitro susceptibilities of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections worldwide: The 2003 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART)
Journal name Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-7453
1460-2091
Publication date 2005-06
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/jac/dki117
Volume 55
Issue 6
Start page 965
End page 973
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, England
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 110309 Infectious Diseases
1108 Medical Microbiology
1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Formatted abstract
Objectives:
The SMART (Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends) surveillance programme was begun in 2002 to monitor antimicrobial resistance trends among aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) isolated from intra-abdominal infections worldwide.

Methods:

In 2003, 74 medical centres from 23 countries collected isolates for testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using broth microdilution according to the NCCLS guidelines for MIC testing.

Results:
A total of 5658 aerobic and facultative GNB were isolated from intra-abdominal infections. Enterobacteriaceae composed 84% of the total isolates. Among the agents tested, the carbapenems were the most consistently active against the Enterobacteriaceae. E. coli was the most common isolate (46%), and the susceptibility rate to the quinolone (70–90% susceptible), cephalosporin (80–97% susceptible), aminoglycoside (77–100% susceptible) and carbapenem (99–100% susceptible) agents tested varied among geographic regions, with isolates from the Asia/Pacific region generally being the most resistant. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) were detected phenotypically in 9% of E. coli, 14% of Klebsiella spp., and 14% of Enterobacter spp. worldwide. ESBL producers generally had a more antibiotic-resistant profile than non-ESBL producers.

Conclusions:
Antimicrobial resistance among GNB isolated from intra-abdominal infections is a problem worldwide, especially in the Asia/Pacific region. The carbapenems ertapenem, meropenem and imipenem are highly active in vitro against Enterobacteriaceae isolated from intra-abdominal sites, including organisms that produce ESBLs.
Keyword Extended spectrum ß-lactamases
ESBLs
Carbapenems
Ertapenem
Enterobacteriaceae
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 25 Jan 2010, 08:58:15 EST by Macushla Boyle on behalf of Royal Brisbane Clinical School