Persistence of oral polio vaccine virus after its removal from the immunisation schedule in New Zealand

Huang, Q. Sue, Greening, Gail, Baker, Michael G., Grimwood, Keith, Hewitt, Joanne, Hulston, Debbie, van Duin, Lisa, Fitzsimons, Amanda, Garrett, Nick, Graham, Nick, Lennon, Diana, Shimizu, Hiroyuki, Miyamura, Tatsuo and Pallansch, Mark A. (2005) Persistence of oral polio vaccine virus after its removal from the immunisation schedule in New Zealand. The Lancet, 366 9483: 394-396. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)66386-6


Author Huang, Q. Sue
Greening, Gail
Baker, Michael G.
Grimwood, Keith
Hewitt, Joanne
Hulston, Debbie
van Duin, Lisa
Fitzsimons, Amanda
Garrett, Nick
Graham, Nick
Lennon, Diana
Shimizu, Hiroyuki
Miyamura, Tatsuo
Pallansch, Mark A.
Title Persistence of oral polio vaccine virus after its removal from the immunisation schedule in New Zealand
Journal name The Lancet   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-6736
1474-547X
Publication date 2005-07-30
Year available 2005
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(05)66386-6
Volume 366
Issue 9483
Start page 394
End page 396
Total pages 3
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Lancet Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
110309 Infectious Diseases
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Abstract On Feb 1, 2002, inactivated poliomyelitis vaccines replaced live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) in New Zealand’s immunisation schedule, allowing systematic monitoring of OPV virus circulation. Findings of paediatric-inpatient surveillance indicate that 7% of children excreted polioviruses before this switch, but none did so 1 month afterwards. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance detected no poliovirus during and after the switch, whereas enterovirus surveillance detected poliovirus only once during the switch. Environmental surveillance identified polioviruses in sewage samples until May, 2002, after which they were detected infrequently. Intratypic differentiation and sequencing showed that all polioviruses were Sabin-like. Multiple surveillance methods hence showed that OPV strains did not persist for extended periods after a vaccine switch in a developed country with a temperate climate. Sequence homology with Sabin vaccine parent strains indicated that polioviruses detected more than 4 months after the switch were of recent origin, consistent with importation from OPV-using countries.
Keyword Poliomyelitis
Polio
Vaccine
Vaccination
Live-attenuated oral poliovirus
Children
Pediatric
Schedule
Program
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 21 Jan 2010, 11:18:50 EST by Macushla Boyle on behalf of Royal Brisbane Clinical School