The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcus infection: Technical report from the New Zealand GBS Consensus Working Party

Campbell, Norma, Eddy, Alison, Darlow, Brian, Stone, Peter and Grimwood, Keith (2004) The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcus infection: Technical report from the New Zealand GBS Consensus Working Party. New Zealand Medical Journal, 117 1200: 1023-1041.


Author Campbell, Norma
Eddy, Alison
Darlow, Brian
Stone, Peter
Grimwood, Keith
Title The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcus infection: Technical report from the New Zealand GBS Consensus Working Party
Journal name New Zealand Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1175-8716
1176-7332
Publication date 2004-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 117
Issue 1200
Start page 1023
End page 1041
Total pages 19
Editor Frank Frizelle
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
Formatted abstract
Aims
Early-onset neonatal group B streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of disease in newborn babies. Since intrapartum antibiotics interrupt vertical GBS transmission, this is now a largely preventable public health problem. An important first step is to develop (then implement) nationally, agreed prevention policies.

Methods

Representatives from the New Zealand College of Midwives, the Paediatric Society of New Zealand, the New Zealand Committee of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, and the Homebirth Association met to review evidence that will assist in the formulation of GBS prevention policies that are most suitable for New Zealand.

Results
The Technical Working Group noted that (i) no strategy will prevent all cases of early-onset GBS infection, (ii) intrapartum antibiotics are associated with rare, but serious, adverse effects, (iii) concerns remain over developing antibiotic resistance, (iv) an economic analysis is required to help inform policy, (iv) reliable bedside diagnostic tests for GBS in early labour are not yet available and (iv) the most important determinant of effectiveness will be compliance with a single national prevention policy.

Conclusions
As an interim measure a GBS risk-based prevention strategy is recommended. This exposes the least numbers of women and their babies to antibiotics, while virtually preventing all deaths from GBS sepsis. Continuing education of health professionals and pregnant women, auditing protocol compliance, tracking adverse events amongst pregnant women, and national surveillance of neonatal sepsis and mortality rates and antibiotic resistance are necessary for the strategy's success.
Keyword Intrapartum antibiotics
Group B streptococcus (GBS)
Infection
Neonates
Q-Index Code CX

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
 
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Created: Wed, 20 Jan 2010, 14:09:00 EST by Gerald Martin on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences