Distinct patterns of evolution between respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B from New Zealand isolates collected over thirty-seven years

Matheson, James W., Rich, Fenella J., Cohet, Catherine, Grimwood, Keith, Huang, Q. Sue, Penny, David, Hendy, Michael D. and Kirman, Joanna R. (2006) Distinct patterns of evolution between respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B from New Zealand isolates collected over thirty-seven years. Journal of Medical Virology, 78 10: 1354-1364. doi:10.1002/jmv.20702


Author Matheson, James W.
Rich, Fenella J.
Cohet, Catherine
Grimwood, Keith
Huang, Q. Sue
Penny, David
Hendy, Michael D.
Kirman, Joanna R.
Title Distinct patterns of evolution between respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B from New Zealand isolates collected over thirty-seven years
Journal name Journal of Medical Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-6615
1096-9071
Publication date 2006-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jmv.20702
Volume 78
Issue 10
Start page 1354
End page 1364
Total pages 11
Place of publication New York, U. S. A.
Publisher Wiley-Liss
Language eng
Subject 1108 Medical Microbiology
Formatted abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. In New Zealand, infants with RSV disease are hospitalized at a higher rate than other industrialized countries, without a proportionate increase in known risk factors. The molecular epidemiology of RSV in New Zealand has never been described. Therefore, we analyzed viral attachment glycoprotein (G) gene sequences from 106 RSV subgroup A isolates collected in New Zealand between 1967 and 2003, and 38 subgroup B viruses collected between 1984 and 2004. Subgroup A and B sequences were aligned separately, and compared to sequences of viruses isolated from other countries during a similar period. Genotyping and clustering analyses showed RSV in New Zealand is similar and temporally related to viruses found in other countries. By quantifying temporal clustering, we found subgroup B viruses clustered more strongly than subgroup A viruses. RSV B sequences displayed more variability in stop codon usage and predicted protein length, and had a higher degree of predicted O-glycosylation site changes than RSV A. The mutation rate calculated for the RSV B G gene was significantly higher than for RSV A. Together, these data reveal that RSV subgroups exhibit different patterns of evolution, with subgroup B viruses evolving faster than A.
© 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Keyword Molecular evolution
Attachment glycoprotein
Genotype
Mutation rate
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 20 Jan 2010, 11:47:56 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences