Aboriginal craft and subsistence activities at Native Well I and Native Well II, Central Western Highlands, Queensland: Results of a residue and use-wear analysis of backed artefacts

Robertson, Gail (2009). Aboriginal craft and subsistence activities at Native Well I and Native Well II, Central Western Highlands, Queensland: Results of a residue and use-wear analysis of backed artefacts. In Michael Haslam, Gail Robertson, Alison Crowther, Sue Nugent and Luke Kirkwood (Ed.), Archaeological science under a microscope : Studies in residue and ancient DNA analysis in honour of Thomas H. Loy (pp. 239-257) Canberra, ACT, Australia: ANU E Press.


Author Robertson, Gail
Title of chapter Aboriginal craft and subsistence activities at Native Well I and Native Well II, Central Western Highlands, Queensland: Results of a residue and use-wear analysis of backed artefacts
Title of book Archaeological science under a microscope : Studies in residue and ancient DNA analysis in honour of Thomas H. Loy
Place of Publication Canberra, ACT, Australia
Publisher ANU E Press
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Terra Australis
ISBN 9881921536847
Editor Michael Haslam
Gail Robertson
Alison Crowther
Sue Nugent
Luke Kirkwood
Volume number 30
Chapter number 18
Start page 239
End page 257
Total pages 19
Total chapters 19
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subjects B1
210101 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Archaeology
950503 Understanding Australia's Past
Abstract/Summary This research provides insight into activities at two adjoining Aboriginal rockshelters in the Central Highlands in western Queensland, Native Well I and Native Well II. The study involved a residue and use-wear analysis of the backed artefact component of the stone assemblage. Prior to this, interpretation of the sites essentially relied on evidence of changes in stone technology over time, sequential and spatial patterning of artefacts and ethnographic analogy. This analysis revealed a range of activities occurring during the mid-to-late Holocene. Backed artefacts were used as knives, scrapers and/or incisors for wood-working and bone-working, as well as knives and scrapers for plant processing, including cooked starchy plants. Artefacts with ochre and feather residues may have been used for ceremonial purposes, while distribution of resin indicates more than half the artefacts had been hafted.
Keyword Residue Analysis
Use-wear-analysis
Microscopy
Australian backed atefacts
Aboriginal rockshelters
Archaeological science
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Fri, 15 Jan 2010, 09:58:56 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science