Re-conceptualising desert landscapes: unpacking historical narratives and contemporary realities for sustainable livelihood development in central Australia

Maclean, Kirsten (2009) Re-conceptualising desert landscapes: unpacking historical narratives and contemporary realities for sustainable livelihood development in central Australia. GeoJournal, 74 5: 451-463. doi:10.1007/s10708-008-9234-9


Author Maclean, Kirsten
Title Re-conceptualising desert landscapes: unpacking historical narratives and contemporary realities for sustainable livelihood development in central Australia
Journal name GeoJournal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0343-2521
1572-9893
Publication date 2009-10
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10708-008-9234-9
Volume 74
Issue 5
Start page 451
End page 463
Total pages 13
Editor Daniel Z Sui
Jocelyn Davies
Sarah Holcombe
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Subject C1
050201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050209 Natural Resource Management
960604 Environmental Management Systems
Abstract Desert landscapes of central Australia have inspired various narratives for nation building. These narratives, based upon discourses of land as a commodity for the colonial project, include the inferior peripheral wastelands of the colonial centre; the wild and pristine haven of ‘noble aborigines’; and the frontier home of heroic explorers and pastoralists. These narratives continue to influence land management policy and practice. However they do not reflect the diverse contemporary realities of individuals living in the region. In this paper I juxtapose these narratives and realities to reveal the multitude of ways in which desert landscapes are known and understood. A case study of a fire management project that involved Aboriginal, pastoral and conservation land managers from the southern Tanami region of central Australia provides evidence as to why desert landscapes should be re-conceptualized as cultural, contested and dynamic. To conceive of these spaces and places in this way can facilitate open discussion and dialogue between land managers from the region. It is the first step in working towards the process of cultural hybridity that I argue is necessary for equitable and sustainable environmental governance and management in Australia.
Keyword Conservation
Desert
Fire
Aboriginal
Pastoral lease
Sustainable livelihoods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Jan 2010, 15:56:19 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Integrative Systems