The utility of mosquito-borne disease as an environmental monitoring tool in tropical ecosystems

Jardine, Andrew, Cook, Angus and Weinstein, Philip (2008) The utility of mosquito-borne disease as an environmental monitoring tool in tropical ecosystems. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 10 12: 1409-1414. doi:10.1039/b806520a


Author Jardine, Andrew
Cook, Angus
Weinstein, Philip
Title The utility of mosquito-borne disease as an environmental monitoring tool in tropical ecosystems
Journal name Journal of Environmental Monitoring   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-0325
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1039/b806520a
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 10
Issue 12
Start page 1409
End page 1414
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge, UK
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Language eng
Subject 0502 Environmental Science and Management
Abstract The intrinsic link between ecosystem health and human health has been firmly established in the literature and has given rise to the development of new multidisciplinary fields of research such as medical geology. An important practical implication of the ecosystem health approach is the utility of human disease outbreaks as indicators of underlying ecosystem disruption. The use of such a bioindicator is particularly relevant in developing countries where monitoring of traditional environmental and ecological indicators is not routinely undertaken. Mosquito-borne diseases appear to have good potential as bioindicators in tropical regions because the burden of disease is high, the disease ecology has a strong environmental component and intensive surveillance systems are well established. Evidence is reviewed regarding the utility of mosquito-borne disease to detect a range of ecosystem insults including: hydro-geological disruption in soil–water systems (e.g. secondary soil salinisation and waterlogging); escalating agricultural intensification; deforestation; and urbanisation. The evidence suggests that overall, mosquito-borne disease is a specific but insensitive indicator, because human modification of natural ecosystems does not always result in increases in disease incidence and can, in some cases, lead to reductions. Nevertheless, mosquito-borne disease remain useful as bioindicators if utilised as a complement to traditional environmental variables in identifying ecological disturbances; they can then assist in directing interventions that are concurrently beneficial to both human health and ecosystem health.
Keyword Mosquito-borne diseases
Bioindicators
Ecosystem health
Human health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 12 Jan 2010, 11:45:32 EST by Michael Affleck on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences