Surviving in the mainstream: Capacity of children with autism spectrum disorders to perform academically and regulate their emotions and behavior at school

Ashburner, J., Ziviani, J. and Rodger, S. (2010) Surviving in the mainstream: Capacity of children with autism spectrum disorders to perform academically and regulate their emotions and behavior at school. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 4 1: 18-27. doi:10.1016/j.rasd.2009.07.002


Author Ashburner, J.
Ziviani, J.
Rodger, S.
Title Surviving in the mainstream: Capacity of children with autism spectrum disorders to perform academically and regulate their emotions and behavior at school
Journal name Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1750-9467
Publication date 2010-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.rasd.2009.07.002
Volume 4
Issue 1
Start page 18
End page 27
Total pages 10
Editor Johnny L. Matson
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
Abstract This study compares teachers’ perceptions of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their perceptions of typically developing students with regard to capacity to perform academically and regulate emotions and behavior in mainstream classrooms. A case-control research design was used to compare teacher ratings of academic performance and classroom emotional and behavioral regulation of 28 students with ASD (with average range IQ) and 51 age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD) students drawn from the same mainstream classrooms. Teachers rated students with ASD as exhibiting behavioral and emotional difficulties (including attention difficulties, anxiety, depression, oppositional and aggressive behaviors) to a significantly higher level than their typically developing peers. Fifty-four percent of students with ASD were rated as under-achieving academically as compared to 8% of typically developing students. Students with ASD seem to be underperforming relative to their level of ability and are struggling to maintain their attention and regulate their emotions and behaviors in mainstream classrooms, despite receiving a range of specialist support services in the classroom. Consideration needs to be given to investigating alternative models of supporting these students in mainstream classrooms and assisting them to develop strategies to cope with the student role.
Keyword Autism
Asperger's syndrome
School
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 10 Jan 2010, 00:00:54 EST