Colorectal cancer screening with faecal occult blood testing: Community intention, knowledge, beliefs and behaviour

Tong, S., Hughes, K., Oldenburg, B. and Del Mar, C. (2006) Colorectal cancer screening with faecal occult blood testing: Community intention, knowledge, beliefs and behaviour. Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health., 18 1: 16-23.


Author Tong, S.
Hughes, K.
Oldenburg, B.
Del Mar, C.
Title Colorectal cancer screening with faecal occult blood testing: Community intention, knowledge, beliefs and behaviour
Journal name Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health.   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1010-5395
Publication date 2006-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/10105395060180010401
Volume 18
Issue 1
Start page 16
End page 23
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hong Kong, China
Publisher Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the current community intention, knowledge, beliefs and behaviour regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with faecal occult blood testing (FOBT). A cross sectional telephone survey of the general population was conducted in Queensland, Australia. A random sample of 1,136 residents aged 40-80 years were invited to participate in the survey with a response rate of 77.8%. 77.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 74.0 to 80.7%) of respondents reported that they would participate in CRC screening by FOBT if recommended to do so by doctors or health authorities. Screening intention was significantly associated with interest in further information concerning CRC or CRC screening (odds ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 3.4 – 13.1), belief that CRC screening is necessary for persons without symptoms (5.0; 95% CI: 1.5 – 17.1), and belief that treating bowel cancer in the early stages increases a person’s chance of survival (5.1; 95% CI: 2.6 – 9.9). Knowledge of seeking medical advice (2.8; 95% CI: 0.9 – 8.7) and diarrhoea/constipation as a symptom of CRC (1.7; 95% CI: 0.9 – 3.2), self-initiated screening behaviour (1.5; 95% CI: 0.8 – 2.9), and medical check a couple of times a year or more (2.4; 95% CI: 0.9 – 6.5) were also marginally significantly associated with screening intention. Community intention to screen for CRC with FOBT may have increased over recent years. Screening intention is associated with community knowledge, attitudes/beliefs and behaviour.
Keyword Colorectal cancer
Blood testing
Community intention
Community beliefs
Community behaviour
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Nursing and Midwifery Publications
 
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