Effects of a short-term individualized exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes

Hordern, Matthew D., Smith, Louise M., Beller, Elaine M., Prins, Johannes B., Marwick, Thomas H. and Coombes, Jeff S. (2007) Effects of a short-term individualized exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39 5 Suppl.: S40-S41. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000273046.98601.0a


Author Hordern, Matthew D.
Smith, Louise M.
Beller, Elaine M.
Prins, Johannes B.
Marwick, Thomas H.
Coombes, Jeff S.
Title Effects of a short-term individualized exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity in patients with type II diabetes
Journal name Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0195-9131
Publication date 2007-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1249/01.mss.0000273046.98601.0a
Volume 39
Issue 5 Suppl.
Start page S40
End page S41
Total pages 2
Place of publication Maryland, M.O., U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Formatted abstract
PURPOSE:
To determine the effects of a four week individualized, supervised exercise program on insulin sensitivity, body mass index (BMI) and exercise capacity (VO2max) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Determinants of change were also investigated.


METHODS:
Patients were randomized into usual care (n=38) or exercise intervention (n=37) consisting of two one-hour supervised exercise sessions and one home-based session per week for four weeks. The supervised gym-based sessions and the home-based sessions involved individualized, moderate intensity cardiorespiratory and resistance exercises. Before and after the intervention, insulin sensitivity (QUICKI), blood lipid profile, VO2max and BMI were assessed. T-tests were used to assess between group differences. Pearsons correlations and multiple regression analysis measured associations and independent predictors. Significance was set at p<0.05.


RESULTS:
There was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in BMI (2.9%) and increases in VO2max (12.2%) and insulin sensitivity (5.9%) in the intervention group compared to controls. Improvement in insulin sensitivity was significantly (p<0.05) associated with baseline BMI (r=0.30) and inversely correlated with baseline VO2max (r=-0.38) and baseline insulin sensitivity (r=-0.58). Using multiple regression, improvements in insulin sensitivity were independently predicted by baseline insulin sensitivity (?=-0.59) accounting for 35.1% of the change (p<0.001). Increases in insulin sensitivity were also significantly (p<0.05) associated with change in VO2max (r=0.30) and reduction in BMI (r=-0.48). These two variables independently predict 31.6% (p<0.001) of the change in insulin sensitivity ([beta]=-0.31, [beta]=-0.42 respectively).


CONCLUSION:
A four-week individualized supervised exercise intervention significantly improved insulin sensitivity, exercise capacity and BMI in patients with type 2 diabetes. The greatest improvements in insulin sensitivity were in individuals with lower baseline insulin sensitivity, exercise capacity, and higher baseline BMI. Improvements in insulin sensitivity were greater when there was an accompanying improvement in exercise capacity and BMI. These findings may assist in targeting exercise interventions to specific patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2007 The American College of Sports Medicine.
Keyword Obesity
Type II diabetes
Exercise
Q-Index Code CX

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 06 Jan 2010, 15:36:29 EST by Tara Johnson on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences