Nineteenth century Cooloola: A history of human contact and environmental change

Brown, Elaine (1996). Nineteenth century Cooloola: A history of human contact and environmental change M.A. Thesis, School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics, The University of Queensland.

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Author Brown, Elaine
Thesis Title Nineteenth century Cooloola: A history of human contact and environmental change
School, Centre or Institute School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1996
Thesis type M.A. Thesis
Supervisor -
Total pages 492
Language eng
Subjects 220000 Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts - General
430000 History and Archaeology
Formatted abstract       Period: the nineteenth century.

      Place: a stretch of the Queensland coast, now named Cooloola

      Genre: environmental history.

      Themes: human contact and environmental change.

Using a wide range of sources, including scientific studies, ethnography, archival material and published works, this thesis examines the history of Cooloola during the nineteenth century, with emphasis on the way its natural environment was perceived and used by both Aborigines and European settlers." The topic is approached through the characteristics of the locality itself, then developed through descriptions and narratives that reveal salient aspects of the Aboriginal presence, the European invasion, and the occupation and abandonment of land.
Keyword Human beings -- Effect of environment on -- Queensland -- Cooloola Region
Aboriginal Australians -- Queensland -- Cooloola Region -- History
Cooloola Region (Qld.) -- History

 
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