Challenges of working with people aged 60 -75 years from culturally and linguistically diverse groups: Repertoire and music therapy approaches employed by Australian Music Therapists

Baker, Felicity and Grocke, Denise (2009) Challenges of working with people aged 60 -75 years from culturally and linguistically diverse groups: Repertoire and music therapy approaches employed by Australian Music Therapists. Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 20 1: 30-55.

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Author Baker, Felicity
Grocke, Denise
Title Challenges of working with people aged 60 -75 years from culturally and linguistically diverse groups: Repertoire and music therapy approaches employed by Australian Music Therapists
Journal name Australian Journal of Music Therapy
ISSN 1036-9457
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 20
Issue 1
Start page 30
End page 55
Total pages 26
Editor Baker, F (peer review process handled by Assistant Editor Dr Katrina McFerran)
Place of publication Turramurra, N.S.W., Australia
Publisher Australian Music Therapy Association
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract Meeting the musical and cultural needs of the increasing number of aging Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups presents a significant challenge to music therapists. Music therapy clinicians working in aged care (N--24) were surveyed to identify the repertoire they use in their aged care work and to identify specific repertoire used with people from CALD groups. In addition, the clinicians were asked to comment on challenges associated with working with people from CALD groups. Repertoire identified included 142 different songs, 15 (11%) of these in languages other than English. Songs were classified into popular, patriotic, folk, musicals, and religious categories. Findings indicated that people with Italian, Greek, German, Yugoslav and Polish backgrounds were the most frequently seen groups. Repertoire for non-European groups was limited, indicating that music therapists need to expand their repertoire to meet the needs of all CALD groups. Challenges faced by clinicians included language barriers between client and clinician, and their lack of knowledge regarding the contexts where specific music selections may be used. Findings suggest that more emphasis be placed on understanding how to best work with CALD groups in music therapy training courses. (author abstract)
Keyword Linguistic Experience
cultural experience
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Music Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 10 Dec 2009, 16:48:23 EST by Mrs Gaylene Wagner on behalf of School of Music