Approaches to landscape- and seascape-scale conservation planning: Convergence, contrasts and challenges

Pressey, Robert L. and Bottrill, Madeleine C. (2009) Approaches to landscape- and seascape-scale conservation planning: Convergence, contrasts and challenges. Oryx, 43 4: 464-475.


Author Pressey, Robert L.
Bottrill, Madeleine C.
Title Approaches to landscape- and seascape-scale conservation planning: Convergence, contrasts and challenges
Journal name Oryx   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0030-6053
1365-3008
Publication date 2009-10-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0030605309990500
Volume 43
Issue 4
Start page 464
End page 475
Total pages 12
Editor Fisher, M.
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
960604 Environmental Management Systems
Abstract Non-government organizations (NGOs), agencies and research groups around the world have developed diverse approaches to conservation planning at the scale of landscapes and seascapes. This diversity partly reflects healthy differences in objectives, backgrounds of planners, and assumptions about data and conservation priorities. Diversity also has disadvantages, including confusion among donors and prospective conservation planners about what to fund and how to plan. To help reduce this confusion, we compared approaches described in separate articles by four major conservation NGOs. We structured our comparison with an 11-stage framework for conservation planning. We found considerable agreement between approaches in their recognition and ways of addressing many planning stages. The approaches diverged most obviously in ways of collecting socio-economic and biodiversity data and identifying explicit conservation objectives. Even here, however, the approaches tend to be complementary and there is potential to combine them in many landscapes and seascapes. Our review emphasizes that systematic methods are having real benefits in guiding effective conservation investments. We finish by outlining two challenges for conservation planning generally: (1) managing the transition from planning to applying conservation actions, and (2) assessing the costs and benefits of conservation planning.
Keyword Biodiversity
Conservation planning
Costs
Data
Guidelines
Implementation
Stakeholders
Threats
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 10 Dec 2009, 14:57:27 EST by Hayley Ware on behalf of School of Biological Sciences